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anewguy
08-26-2008, 08:13 PM
I have a few more questions I hope can be answered simply.

Will one of those $100 welders from WalMart work? I live in a ground floor apartment and need something I could just plug into a regular outlet, or else I need completely new suggestions on a welder.

I have NO experience welding - for use on the bikes, etc., is this going to be difficult to learn? What types of practice materials, perhaps how-tos, etc., will I need?

I'm 6'2" and 350lbs., so from my previous postings on this and another bike I get the impression I should use at least 2" 14 gauge tubing, double walled rims and 3/4 to 1" axle (I'm kinda leaning towards 1" just to be a on the safe side). With the corresponding change in pillow blocks, I assume I should also make the plates the pillow blocks mount to of a heavier gauge as well. What other types of additional reinforcements, etc., would be recommended?

Since I am a big guy, will I need to make adjustments (perhaps move forward?) the steering mount to avoid it hitting me in some sensistive area?

I am on Social Security Disability and have a bad back, so my income is VERY limited. I hopefully will have the money in September to buy the plans I am looking at and then go from there. If I need to build a bike in stages for finacial reasons, what is the best way to protect my work to date from any type of rusting, etc., until I get back to it again?

Thanks for helping an old guy out!!

Dave :)

rykoala
08-26-2008, 08:27 PM
For your welder/tool questions, I recommend this thread:

http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=910

Not just because I wrote it, but because it answers your questions.

I'll leave others to answer your LR questions :-)

Gerald_G
08-26-2008, 08:33 PM
I've got a 110V stick (Arc) welder with a regular outlet plugin on it. It is supposed to run on 20A, but in my experience, it does not. Since the higher amp outlets are not the same shape/size as 20A, I had to add a 30A breaker to my garage panel. Then I ran thicker wire, but to a 20A outlet. So far the outlet has not had issue handling the extra draw. This may not be possible in an apartment, so be prepared to deal with electricity issues if you look at one of those.

gbbwolf
08-26-2008, 09:12 PM
Similiar situation but I ain't on SS.
My delta wolf is made from 1.5 inch 14 guage tubing.
Axles are 3/4 with cast pillow blocks.
I am also 350 pounds with bad back.
I used a 20A wall outlet with a yellow-jacket 100 foot extension cord.
Never once popped a breaker with the mig-welder, or even got hot.
Clarke 130EN mig welder.
Don't know if an arc welder would draw more current.
I moved the steering forward not only because my seat was larger but because of my size and arm length.

Pic's in delta-wolf thread under GBBWolf.

Wipe part's down with some light oil will help with rust a bit.
Or prime it, primer is cheap at 3 bucks a can.

Never welded before myself was not too hard to learn.
Lot's of help in welding section.
Practice on old bed frame or piece's of scrap metal helped me.
And get small stuff and lay welds over top of welds till you get decent looking welds.
Practice with different thicknesses of metal and differnt heat and wirespeed settings if you use a mig.

Nelson

Sparky
08-26-2008, 10:07 PM
the plans can be modified to fit your body size. if you have long arms, place the handlebars further away, etc.

most of the plans are more guidelines than set measurements. youll see when you download em. simple, easy to follow, and with attention to detail (something i need to work on), you get great results. and if ya dont, cut it off and try again :)

welding is fun and easy. i taught myself to weld while living in a second floor apartment. i use a cheapie harbor freight arc welder that i plug into my dryer outlet with an extension cord made from romex.

be safe and keep a fire extinguisher handy. oh- and make friends with your neighbors. angle grinders are loud. :)

TheKid
08-26-2008, 11:21 PM
The welder from Wal-mart is actually a good deal. It will work on a 20 amp breaker, but if you have to use an extension cord, use 12ga. wire minimum. You don't say where you'll be welding, but if it's indoors, you'll have to make sure it's not on a carpeted or linoleum floor. Sparks fly when welding.
Learning to weld is no big deal, many of us never welded before starting one of these projects.
3/4" axles are as large as you can go if using bicycle components, plenty strong for over 500 lbs.
You'll probably have to mod the plans a bit to accomodate your size, but Brad shows you how to properly make those changes. The plans start with certain measurements, but Brad explains that they're based on his size, and either gives a formula to determine some measurements, or shows how to get other measurements. For example, in the Delta Wolf plan, he explains how he determined the width of the rear end, and what to add if your shoulders are wider than his. Later he shows how to get the correct placement of the bottom bracket and pedals, which also determines how long the main boom should be.
Build and enjoy!

anewguy
08-27-2008, 12:21 AM
The welder from Wal-mart is actually a good deal. It will work on a 20 amp breaker, but if you have to use an extension cord, use 12ga. wire minimum. You don't say where you'll be welding, but if it's indoors, you'll have to make sure it's not on a carpeted or linoleum floor. Sparks fly when welding.
Learning to weld is no big deal, many of us never welded before starting one of these projects.
3/4" axles are as large as you can go if using bicycle components, plenty strong for over 500 lbs.
You'll probably have to mod the plans a bit to accomodate your size, but Brad shows you how to properly make those changes. The plans start with certain measurements, but Brad explains that they're based on his size, and either gives a formula to determine some measurements, or shows how to get other measurements. For example, in the Delta Wolf plan, he explains how he determined the width of the rear end, and what to add if your shoulders are wider than his. Later he shows how to get the correct placement of the bottom bracket and pedals, which also determines how long the main boom should be.
Build and enjoy!

Thanks for the info! I sure hope that type of welder will work, so your opinion gives me hope!!

I will be doing my welding outdoors - won't be on my concrete patio but what I've been thinking of doing anyway is to build a wooden jig to hold everything in alignment, allow for clamps, etc., and also for adjustments as needed until I think everything is okay.

Sounds like Brad really does his work and gives simple yet very effective instructions. I'm thinking of the LoadRunner, but may go for the Delta Runner when the plans are available as I kind of like the looks of it. Might build a small 2-wheel trailer to attach to some sort of hitch on the bike for when I want to get groceries, go to the park for a picnic, etc..

One other question about something I haven't seen addressed in the forums - I have to use a cane all the time, and was wondering if anyone had any ideas for a "cane mount" that would be accessable from the seat. This could be brackets with some sort of catch, a tube, whatever, as long as it is accessabe from the seat as I will need it to get into and get out of the bike.

Thanks everyone!!

TheKid
08-27-2008, 01:25 AM
That welder will work fine. I also use a cane, and made a simple mount from a piece of 1 1/2" PVC pipe and cap available at Home Depot, Lowes, hardware stores, etc. I mounted it in a boat seat, using the screws that hold the seat hinge to the seat back, but it will work on any seat. Once the cap is glued on, you drill two holes slightly larger than the threads vertically. Then on the opposite side of the tube, you drill two holes larger than the screw heads, insert the screws through the large holes and into the smaller ones, and into the seat. Very simple, yet effective. If you look close, you'll see the large holes for the screws on the back of the tube. The second pic shows another tube for carrying a fishing rod. That seat was meant for a single version of the Kyoto Cruiser, of which I made simple changes to the fron end to make it a Delta Runner.

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Fox%20Rack/000_0436Small.jpg?t=1219814264

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Fox%20Rack/000_0442Small.jpg

jimFPU
08-27-2008, 10:09 AM
Hey Kid, can you post a close up of how you did your disc's on the front? I like the USS set up too, works well I suppose?

TheKid
08-27-2008, 11:29 AM
You'll have to make mounts for the calipers.

http://s192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/caliper%20template

The photo shows the new kingpin using Brad's method. In the background, you see a caliper mounted to the old steering knuckle. The caliper mount is welded to a piece of bed frame, and gets welded to the axle mount in a way that it's an extension of the axle mount. I'll have pics of the finished product later.

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Tadpole%20steering/000_0208Small.jpg?t=1219850716

jimFPU
08-27-2008, 11:46 AM
Many thanks, looking forward to the other pics.

jimFPU
08-27-2008, 11:51 AM
Now back to the thread...

I have one of those 'cheap' welders and asked a ton of questions before I even unpacked it...let me tell you to just get one, unpack it, tirn it on, shield your eyes, and post the results for critique.

That's what I did (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php?t=938), and got great feedback...then it's just learning to do the 'art' of welding.

anewguy
08-29-2008, 07:14 PM
Thanks guys! I'll be closing this thread for now. I appreciate the input, and sure I hope I can end up with something that looks as good as yours does, TheKid.

Hopefully come September I'll be able to afford to download the plan and then I can see how everything is supposed to work, etc.. :)