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TheKid
11-20-2008, 11:20 PM
Without going into boring details, it turned out that making a fairing for the DR will be faster than for the Fox. Since the cold wet weather is coming fast, I started on this project. I made a rough drawing for what it will look like, and started making the tailbox. The fairing will be modular, so I can have the full fairing when I need it, and a canopy and tailbox when it isn't raining.

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0559Small.jpg

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0558Small.jpg

mvk2604
11-20-2008, 11:54 PM
kinda looks like this


http://www.lightfootcycles.com/rainshadow.htm

Marty

mvk2604
11-20-2008, 11:58 PM
Or this one looks neat.

http://www.krash.us/velokit-photos.html

marty

TheKid
11-21-2008, 12:46 AM
I got the idea from Lightfoot, as well as a few other pics. If you notice, the Lightfoot fairings have the front wheel exposed, which combined with the flat surfaces and the the flat piece behind the wheel, actually slow the trikes down at speeds higher than 12 mph. In addition, the Lightfoot's are made of coroplast, while my fairing will be made of fiberglass in the most vulnerable areas, and epoxy over spandex on the sides. The foam will be melted once the epoxy over the glass cures. The tailbox will have a few ribs on the outside to form the wheelwells, and to add curvurture to the sides.
The second fairing you posted is for a tadpole, made mainly of waterproof fabric. When I first checked it out, I thought it was kind of high priced, thinking the windshield was just plastic sheet. I didn't realize it was formed.

TheKid
11-21-2008, 01:14 AM
It will feature front turn signals, bullet headlights, taillight, brake light, turn signal units for a golf cart, and an OOO-GA horn. Some more rough drawings:

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0560Small.jpg

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0561Small.jpg

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0562Small.jpg

SirJoey
11-21-2008, 07:38 AM
...and you're not a half bad artist, either! :)


http://img356.imageshack.us/img356/2839/thanksgivingsigsmalllu5.jpg

Radical Brad
11-21-2008, 10:37 AM
If you want, I will add this to the "submissions" part of the site when I finally have the time to add it.

Brad

TheKid
11-21-2008, 03:22 PM
Sure, why not? It's going to be a long process. Even with the fast hardener, the epoxy takes 8 hrs. to dry in my 50 degree basement. I started glassing the box, and once the inside has the first coat of epoxy, rigid foam will be glassed in for extra support. The supports get heavier fabric. Once that's done, a shelf will go on the inside at the height of the seat. Then an opening will be cut so I could see out the rear. Next comes the door for the trunk, which will use HD European cabinet hinges, and a garage door lock. Then the foam will be melted away, and a coat of heavy epoxy will be applied. I bought yellow and red tints so I could make the fairing orange. I'll test that out with the heavy coat. Once the tailbox is installed, I'll start the ribs for the wheelwells, and the ribs for the frame. A friend who built a boat told me he made the ribs from rigid and semi-flexible foam. Extremely lightweight, very strong and rigid, and no chance for dry rot. The 1" thick rigid foam is cut to a curve, and two strips of 1/2" semi-flexible foam, 2" wide, are tacked to the rigid foam, making a curved I-beam. That gets glassed over, making a very strong frame member.

trikeman
11-21-2008, 03:27 PM
I think we need some pictures of this.

trikeman
11-21-2008, 03:48 PM
Chicks think velomobiles are sexy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5vMSAR_OHM

TheKid
11-21-2008, 04:40 PM
This is all I have so far. The epoxy is still a bit tacky, even after hitting it with a hair dryer for an hour after it's been setting for 4 hrs. This was one batch, 1 oz. hardener to 4 oz. of resin:

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0563Small.jpg

Hopefully it will be dry enough to continue in another 2 or 3 hours. Once the back and bottom ars done, I can continue with the sides tomorrow, and add the reinforcements on Sunday. The basement is a little warmer now, almost 60 degrees. I also have the project next to a heater, so that may help speed things up.

TheKid
11-21-2008, 09:49 PM
I was anxious to see how the tinting worked, so I put the first coat of thick epoxy on the Streetfox wheelwells. I jumped the gun and forgot to sand it first. Normally, you'd sand it down, wipe it with acetone or lacquer thinner, then mix some thick epoxy with a filler to make a putty. You use the putty to fill in the low spots, the sand it smooth, and apply the finish coat of thick epoxy, wet sand, then polish when it has cured fully.
The first pic shows the coloring before spreading out the epoxy. the second shows the epoxy spread out. I'll use the wheelwells to experiment with, and by the time I'm done with the DR fairing, the wheelwells will at jeast be finished for the Fox. I may need to double up on the tinting. I used 2 drops of yellow, and one drop of red to 5 oz. of epoxy.

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0565Small.jpg

http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z66/edpol_photos/Delta%20Runner/000_0564Small.jpg

jimFPU
11-22-2008, 09:26 AM
Hey Kid, what kind of $$ investment in materials so far? I'm told this will probably be the most expensive part of the build...

TheKid
11-22-2008, 10:16 AM
I got the fan fold foam from a contractor, it was left over from a job. 1.25 gallons of thick epoxy, 5 yds of cloth, 2 lbs. of filler, and the pigments were $140, and another $120 for some thicker cloth, 3" glass tape and 1.5 gal. of thin epoxy. I also bought 10 yds. of spandex for $10 last year. Polyester resin is about 1/3 the cost, but it's brutal on your skin if you aren't careful, and a respirator is mandatory if you can't hold your breath too long, and it's highly flammable. I learned the hard way many years ago not to use polyester resin in the house. It also tends to develop hailine cracks. You could see that effect on cheap boats.
Epoxy resin is virtually odorless, and washes off with soap and water.
I also bought some bubble buster rollers a long time ago, which are IMO a must if you have little or no experience. They only cost a few bcks. A short and a long roller, and a corner roller are recommended.
I spread the epoxy with a squeegee cut from plastic milk cartons. You can cut them to short lengths for tight squeezes, but remember to round off the corners a little bit so you don't damage the cloth. Small plastic measuring cups are also helpful. They're cheap, and you can easily mix small amounts at a time, which is recommended for beginners. I only made one or two projects using glass and resin, so I'm still a newbie. Search the web for tutorials, there's a lot of them and they all help.
I bought my supplies here:

http://www.uscomposites.com/

jimFPU
11-22-2008, 11:29 AM
Cool, good info, thanks.

jimFPU
11-22-2008, 11:33 AM
Chicks think velomobiles are sexy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5vMSAR_OHM
Um....ooooooo K....:alien: