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GizDrak
01-14-2010, 03:13 PM
I have started to build my warrior. and I been practicing welding on the steel tubing. I can lay a bead down on top of the tubing no trouble but any time I try and weld around a edge I get a burn-through right has I start my puddle and it is driving me nuts. I lowered the amps and still have the same problem I lowered the amp to the point I could not even get a arch going so I figured that was to low.

Any advice on avoiding burn through when welding around the edges of the tubing?

I am using a stick welder with 6013 rod using between 40-80 amps.

PeterT
01-14-2010, 05:37 PM
With your welding, continue through past the corner, so that you actually build up a bit more metal on the corners, and then start your next side so that you try and start on the metal deposited in the last weld.

PeterT

darwin-t
01-14-2010, 08:11 PM
It's a real problem. I think the idea is to concentrate the puddle on the flat part and away from the edge - you can't weld very far at a time though. It gets too hot and you burn through.


I am having the same problem.

What size(s) rods are you using? I have tried 1/16, 5/64 and 1/8. I can't decide if smaller rods run hotter or larger ones do. My choices or 50 and 90 amps, AC.

GizDrak
01-14-2010, 09:12 PM
I am using a 3/32 rod. from what I read and understand so far the size of the rod does not control the heat. But it would make sense if the larger the rod the strong the arch force was because there would be more surface to arch off of.

I know that 3/32 is rated up to 1/4 thickness which means it can weld up to 1/4 thick metal.

I am using a DC welder the best setting I have found on my welder so far is about 50-55 amps when trying to weld the 16ga tubing

Here some information on rods.

http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/weldrod.html



It's a real problem. I think the idea is to concentrate the puddle on the flat part and away from the edge - you can't weld very far at a time though. It gets too hot and you burn through.


I am having the same problem.

What size(s) rods are you using? I have tried 1/16, 5/64 and 1/8. I can't decide if smaller rods run hotter or larger ones do. My choices or 50 and 90 amps, AC.

savarin
01-15-2010, 12:35 AM
Start the bead on a scrap piece of metal so you can flow onto the joint and keep going smoothly. This often helps prevent the start burn through.
Unfortunately you have to practice to get to recognise what is really happening in the puddle and move a bit faster as you see the start of the hole appearing.
After a while you will be able to pass back and forth to fill the hole as you weld but again be careful not to include the slag.
The slag and molten metal are two different colours but it takes a bit of concentration to recognise the difference.
Good luck and keep practicing.

ken will
01-15-2010, 06:01 AM
Tilting the rod slightly can make a difference. Think of the rod as a hose, it actually has a little pressure squirting out of the end which can blow the molten steel away. With practice you can push the steel into or out of the puddle. It just takes a lot of practice, or in Brad's case natural talent,.. and a lot of practice. :punk:

dwkennedy
01-15-2010, 10:57 AM
I have started to build my warrior. and I been practicing welding on the steel tubing. I can lay a bead down on top of the tubing no trouble but any time I try and weld around a edge I get a burn-through right has I start my puddle and it is driving me nuts. I lowered the amps and still have the same problem I lowered the amp to the point I could not even get a arch going so I figured that was to low.

Any advice on avoiding burn through when welding around the edges of the tubing?

I am using a stick welder with 6013 rod using between 40-80 amps.

Use a MIG welder instead :)

I tried DC stick welding for the first time last week, it wasn't pretty. I think it helps immensely to find somebody who knows what they're doing to get you started.

I've heard the basic welding class at Moore-Norman Tech Center is worthwhile. You can bring projects to class and get help from the instructor as well!

GizDrak
01-15-2010, 11:17 AM
Use a MIG welder instead :)

I tried DC stick welding for the first time last week, it wasn't pretty. I think it helps immensely to find somebody who knows what they're doing to get you started.

I've heard the basic welding class at Moore-Norman Tech Center is worthwhile. You can bring projects to class and get help from the instructor as well!


Yeah I just found out a guy here at work has been welding for years he said he would help me out so planning on getting with him and seeing if he can help me figure it out :-).