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schu777
03-03-2010, 07:56 PM
Saturday afternoon I was working on work stuff (programmer) and while I was waiting for something to run, I went to Craigslist to see if there was anything worth looking at. Right at the top of the list was a 90amp Flux wire welder. Went in, no picture but was described decently. Checked to see how old the post was and it was only 1/2 hour old - called the number and they still had it. So I got the address and confirmed on the phone that it would pull up in Google maps. Took a 20 minute drive and found the house, paid the kid $80 for the Chicago Electric 90 amp flux wire welder - threw in the helmet at least, but no spare welding tip or wire/brush - which isn't a big deal. The item is 98871/91124 and hopefully I can find a manual online, but that won't be a big deal if not.

So tonight I decided to test it out. I went to Lowes to pickup a new toliet valve (another story) and a piece of 1/8th steel to "test" it out. It works pretty well and I'm surprised how easy it really was to do a line - now if I had to do that joining a piece, might be different. Since it was in the basement and I was just "testing", I couldn't do much more since I don't want to fill the house up with smoke.

Either way, I'm pretty happy with it. I'm thinking about getting some steel to build the Delta Runner, but I've got other fish to fry before I get going on that build, which is a bummer. I'll try to get some pics later this weekend and some pics of my testing, which I might just get some steel anyway for practice, plus a grinder to see how good my welds are, but that depends on if my son can sleep through the noise in the garage - his room right above it.

Oh well - enough for now.

Michael

darwin-t
03-03-2010, 08:27 PM
It sounds like you are off to a good start. Start just running beads to get started.

Then, if you can find a cheap or free bike, cut it up and weld the pieces back together. Just to learn how to do it. Or a piece of electrical conduit. I think you need to sand/grind off the coating on it before welding. It can give off toxic fumes.

schu777
03-04-2010, 09:08 AM
It sounds like you are off to a good start. Start just running beads to get started.

Then, if you can find a cheap or free bike, cut it up and weld the pieces back together. Just to learn how to do it. Or a piece of electrical conduit. I think you need to sand/grind off the coating on it before welding. It can give off toxic fumes.

I'm thinking about picking up the steel for the Delta runner tomorrow - I've got a couple of "free" bikes, one that is really good, one that was just a frame and same with another one, so those might be good to cut up to gain room in the garage and then just to practice welding too.

graucho
03-04-2010, 09:44 AM
Your on your way! Congrats. With a little practice you'll be a bike-alcoholic. :rockon:

schu777
03-09-2010, 03:58 PM
Last Friday I ventured to the steel supplier - he didn't have the 1.5" sq. that I needed, but I did manage to pick up the 5/8" rod and some flat 1/8" steel for making the wheels - which I'm just going to hold on to for now. I also got some other square tubing to practice on.

On Friday night after putting my son to bed, I started out in the garage and hoping the power would be good enough for the welder. I think it will work for now unless I see that the results of welding doesn't get easier. I practiced on the flat 1/8" for some of it and then quit as it was getting late and I was tired - not a good thing to do things when you are tired.

Saturday afternoon my son was taking a nap (2 years old) so I set out to cut the 1" sq. tube into 4 equal pieces to weld together as a practice. It went okay and got better as I went. It isn't perfect by any means, but each time I worked on it, I got better at starting where I needed to be instead of off to the side.

I learned a few things:

1) An auto-darking helmet is going to be a really, really nice to have. Luckily Harbor Freight is having a sale this Friday through Sunday (March 12th throug the 14th) for a pretty good price, so I'm heading there early Friday to make the purchase.
2) Measure twice, cut once
3) More than one hand grinder would be a very nice thing to have. Having to change disk/brush/sanding disk all the time is a hassle and to speed things up would be to have two if not three of them.
4) Practice more on the welding before attempting to work on the building of the bike. I've looked at others pictures of welding and wondered how good mine would be or wouldn't be...well, as I said...practice.

After looking at what is needed the Delta Runner, I'm thinking now about building the Marauder with a rear and possible front suspension - although I'll post pics of the bike I have and see if people think it is possible.

Michael

schu777
04-23-2010, 09:53 PM
Today I took 3 hours of vacation to spend working on the bikes. Plus did some practice welding. I cut up the Red Honda bike and took off the rear suspension for building the M2 - cut the head tube off and also the pivot point - switched gears and took the grinder and cleaned up the cuts. After that, I took the remainder of the frame and cleaned the paint off and did some practice welds. I was going decent and then I ran out of wire - so I started to clean shop since the weather doesn't look good and wanted the truck in the garage. I went to lowes to get a few things and picked up wire at the same time, came home to do some more practice. This time I was trying to fill holes up, so I speed up the wire feed rate and went better, then I tried laying a bead - that went better with the faster wire - more coming out and less blowing holes like I did before.

So the question is - what speed does everyone run at? I'm sure it is different for all, but I'm running around 6 now instead of 3...

Michael

savarin
04-23-2010, 11:15 PM
Personally I dont look at the speed just a quick check before I start so its in the right ballpark then adjust as the results come in. I probably use a faster speed than most but its dictated by how the bead goes. More speed also turns up the heat so too much will burn through.
Leave the hole and continue welding then come back and fill the hole.
When you get used to controlling the weld you will want to go hotter as it gives a flatter bead with more penetration but it is easier to burn holes till you get used to it.
It seems to me that the suggested thicknesses of metal to be welded as shown on a lot of machines is a bit over enthusiastic and you need a bit more power than they suggest for good results.
Mind you this may just be my machine.