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babelloyd
04-30-2010, 12:57 AM
Hi all,

I am super-green newbie to all of this, and I'm think a tutorial on painting basics would help me (and maybe others) a lot. I don't know the first thing about painting a bike.

What kind of paint should I use? Where can I get it? Do I use a brush or what? What is primer? What is finish? What is powder? Do I assemble a bike first, then disassemble it, then paint it, then reassemble it? What parts can be painted and what parts can't? Do I paint a bike all at once, or section by section? How can I let the paint dry with out leaving marks from whatever the bike is resting on?

See? I'm clueless. That's why I'm here!

Thanks for your time!

Dave

Radical Brad
04-30-2010, 12:30 PM
That is on my list for front page content, but that will not happen until the deep freeze sends me back to my igloo again!

How long until your are ready to paint? Maybe timing will work for both of us.

Brad

babelloyd
04-30-2010, 12:39 PM
Well, I've barely even started preparing to build the Kyoto. I've chopped up a couple of scrap frames, but that's it. I still need a place to weld.

However, I was thinking of painting a different bike.

Anyway, no worries. I'll look forward to that tutorial in the winter if I can't find another way to figure it out.

Thanks Bad!

Dave

fultondp
04-30-2010, 05:01 PM
I think Graucho was planning on doing a flame airbrush tutorial sometime soon....

There are some reasonably good tutorials on youtube. I've also found some bike specific painting tutorials on http://www.instructables.com. You might have a look there.

--Darren

graucho
04-30-2010, 10:24 PM
I think Graucho was planning on doing a flame airbrush tutorial sometime soon....
--Darren

You are correct. I have just started up again on my current bike after a needed break.
When the bike is done and prepped I will do a "play by play". But yes... I will be doing
airbrushing and flames so I dont know if it will be much help for babelloyd.

babelloyd... maybe finish your bike, ride it for a week, disassemble it, spray it with rattle can Rustoleum primer.
Then pick your favorite Rustoleum rattle can color, then a few coats of rattle can Rustoleum clear coat.
Reassemble and ride the heck out of it with a big smile. :cheesy: When you get closer to the finish of your build
I'll chime in at painting time. Please.... others please comment with your thoughts.

savarin
04-30-2010, 11:04 PM
What kind of paint should I use?
Some general info http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint
Quality two pack automotive paints are probably the best but are expensive, Standard spray cans of enamel are fine and that’s what most of us here use.
If you get right into it paints suitable for our bikes break down into, enamels, lacquers acrylics, polyurethanes, Which ever one you choose then stick with it and do not change to another on that job as some paints damage or will not stick to the others.
Always try to get the full instructions that apply to the paint you use to ensure correct results.


Where can I get it?
Hardware stores, automotive spares and after marcket stores, special paint suppliers.


Do I use a brush or what?
Depends upon the paint used. Brush can be done with excellent results but most of us prefer spray, either cans of using an air compressor and spray guns. Cans are the cheapest method for small numbers of items, if you believe you will be doing heaps of spray jobs then a compressor may be the way to go.


What is primer?
http://www.duplicolor.com/products/primer.html http://www.type2.com/library/body/primer.htm
Primers prepare the surface for the paint, etching primers are often used on bare metal followed by a filler primer that can be sanded smooth followed by the paint followed by a clear coat. (if desired and your paint requires it) Metallic lustre paints ie. Silver etc look far better with a clear coat on top and stay shinier longer.
If painting aluminium then it is essential to get the correct etching primer for it


What is finish?
Usually the actual colour of the paint or special “look” of the paint, ie hammered finish looks as if the surface has been hit repeatedly by a ball-pein hammer. But could describe the final coat, this could be colour or clear, gloss or matt depending upon your job.
A final clear coat makes it very glossy


What is powder?
My favourite finish as its very very chip resistant.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powder_coating


Do I assemble a bike first, then disassemble it, then paint it, then reassemble it?
This gives the best looking end results


What parts can be painted and what parts can't?
anything that you want that particular colour except for polished aluminium, good chrome, (if its pitted its often better to sand smooth and prime and paint.) If painting plastic parts check on a small area where no one can see to check if the solvents in your paint melt the plastic.


Do I paint a bike all at once, or section by section?
If by “section by section” you mean say the crossbar as a section or down tube as a section then no, do the whole assembly in one go, if you mean the frame or the forks as separate sections then that’s ok. Its very hard to disguise a stop and start line in painting, the best is to keep a wet edge flowing till the complete part is done.


How can I let the paint dry with out leaving marks from whatever the bike is resting on?
Hang it up with a wire or string through one of the small holes, say, the mudguard stay bolt holes. Enamels may take up to a day to dry and a further week to fully harden. Read the instructions on the tins regarding drying times.

Oh, and practice first on a spare frame or whatever if you want a superb finish.

Lots of reading and tutorials available on line, watch these first.
HTH
regards

PeterT
04-30-2010, 11:11 PM
finish your bike, ride it for a week, disassemble it, spray it with rattle can Rustoleum primer.
Then pick your favorite Rustoleum rattle can color, then a few coats of rattle can Rustoleum clear coat.
Reassemble and ride the heck out of it with a big smile. :cheesy:

Dont even think of paint till you have got the bike finished and riding, and mechanically A1!

There is nothing more damaging to a finished paint job, than the frustration of finding out that you haven't welded something important, like beer holders and stereo brackets in the place you can easily reach them whilst riding.

Make sure your bike is 100% riding and looking the way you want it to look & ride, and then remove all non-welded bits, clean off any old paint, surface rust, fill any holes you find, grind excessive welds clean, ...

AND THEN think of paint!

Apply several coats of primer, allowing each to dry properly, and then apply your colour, in several light coats to prevent runs, starting in the most difficult areas like tight angles and corners, and then the rest of the frame. Mask of the bits you dont want that colour paint on and take your time!

Frames, forks and other bits only need a small thin wire to hang off, & can be hung up very simply to allow you to paint wihtout leaving your prints everywhere.

PeterT

Richie Rich
05-01-2010, 12:00 AM
Dave...Some primers, paints and clear coats don't play nice with each other, especially if using different brands of products. I learned this the hard way when I was first starting out. So, before you spend a lot of time on your finished project only to have the paint 'crinkle' or show some 'orange peel', do a test coat on some clean scrap pieces.

And don't rush...!! Allow plenty of drying time between primer, paint and clear. And I don't mean just a few hours. Unless you've got a heated painting booth (HAH..!!), it can take days to get a great looking paint job that you'll be proud of.

But when you're done, there's nothing more satisfying than to show someone your finished project and say 'I made it myself...!!'.

Best of luck with all of your projects and remember to take LOTS of pictures along the way.

....Richie Rich...
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