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Ricklach
03-24-2011, 11:23 AM
I am about to embark on the process of making three warrior trikes. I plan to make use of jigs for cutting the parts and I have a very well equipped shop for the project. While looking at the steering booms of the trike I was unable to ascertain if the cuts were compound angles or just a single angle. Regardless, what were the measurements of the angles when you assembled the frame once you had achieved the desired geometry

Odd Man Out
03-24-2011, 11:34 AM
Welcome
Compound angles -- both ends
Be sure to post picts of your triple build project!

Ricklach
03-24-2011, 02:54 PM
Thanks, what are the angles

Rexer
03-24-2011, 05:37 PM
The angles should be in the plans

Odd Man Out
03-24-2011, 06:24 PM
Yup
ALL the info you will need IS In the plans. Not sure that the exact angles are given since Brad designs for all contigencies but you will have no problems figuring things out once you have the plans in hand...

Ricklach
03-24-2011, 08:17 PM
No, they are not in the plans. The cut was a gestimate but once assembled you should be able to measure the angles.

savarin
03-24-2011, 10:49 PM
When I do things like that I cut to what looks as if it will fit. Tack and align in place, fill all the giant gaps with weld.
With mig its no biggie filling a half inch gap. Just an eyeball should get it almost there that normal welding techniques will work any way.
What about using a short section of boom tube and cut a bit at a time till it fits perfectly then build your jig from that.

Odd Man Out
03-25-2011, 01:10 AM
No, they are not in the plans. The cut was a gestimate but once assembled you should be able to measure the angles.

So, there you go.

Ricklach
03-25-2011, 02:11 PM
So, there you go.

Precision gentlemen - precision. I intend to make a few modifications to the plan and would prefer the "lessons learned" or rather the angles rather than repeat the errors of others. While I would like to thank you for your help there has been none forthcoming.

Odd Man Out
03-25-2011, 02:39 PM
While I would like to thank you for your help there has been none forthcoming.

Snippy Snippy -- There are two reasons why you are not getting exactly what you are requesting:

1. Most importantly, giving out exact info from the plans is highly descouraged here -- there are many who troll the forum for just such info so they do not have to pay for the plans, thereby ripping Brad and Kat off.

2. Brad's plans are written so that people can adapt them as they wish. You are asking for exact angles -- you may get an exact angle from someone who built theirs using a 451 wheel and you are planning to use a 406 or a 306 or a 559... Also the exact size of the headtube used would have to magically match yours and the steering arms would have to perfectly match what you have built. Hope the picture is getting clearer for you.

You are asking for the impossible. You need to build one yourself -- then you will find the angles you need for all subsequent editions.

KoolKat
03-25-2011, 04:37 PM
Precision gentlemen - precision. I intend to make a few modifications to the plan and would prefer the "lessons learned" or rather the angles rather than repeat the errors of others. While I would like to thank you for your help there has been none forthcoming.

Before this thread gets out of hand - Rick: most builders make their own modifications so it's impossible for them to give exact angles for every single step of their project. Different parts used, individual height and weight variances, etc.

Blueprints assume that you will build an identical copy of something. This is almost impossible when it comes to creating a bike or trike without having access to a large machine shop (like most of us DIYers) or large supply of parts. For instance, the Warrior Tadpole Racing Trike can be made to accommodate riders of varying weights and heights, so forcing the design into a rigid blueprint format would force a 5'-2" tall 150 pound rider to build a trike suited for a 6'-4" tall, 350 pound rider!

Our plans take the builder through every step of the building process, and then explain modifications that can be made to suit the builder’s needs, rather than assume everyone wants the same exact final product. The same principle holds true for materials. There are hundreds of different variations on parts such as wheels, forks, and bicycle frames. Our plans allow you to adapt to whatever parts you have on hand or can acquire, making suggestions along the way for alternative parts. A "cut here" list or a "bill of materials" forces the builder to seek out specific brands of components, hoping that they are still manufactured or within their individual budgets.

We have found that this rigid format does not work for the majority of homebuilt bike builders, and creates much more frustration than simply allowing the builder to do some self-calculations or explore his/her own creativity before beginning the building process. Just have a look at our gallery to see the amazing diversity shown in our builders’ completed bikes and trikes. We’re all about thinking outside the box.

To quote AZ veteran bike builder PeterT: “You need to remember one thing - you are building your bike, with your budget, and your abilities, to your specifications, talents and expectations. You might spend hours/days/weeks etc. trying to sort out your cut list, but as soon as you walk into the actual store to purchase your required cuts, you will change your mind, and think of some wonderful way of modifying the design you want to build, so I offer some prudent advise - do a rough cut list to make sure that you have enough material for the basics, and then become friendly with the person serving you because you will be seeing him again and again, when you have 6" left and you need 9" to finish something, or you want to see if something else would look better on your new bike. Don't over-think things or you will never get started.”

This community is an awesome resource. Many here share their experiences and advice every day. There are many examples of bikes in the gallery based on AZ designs - most builders had no welding or bike building experience beforehand. Obsessing about perfection and precision tends to be more of a hindrance, not an asset, in this hobby.

KoolKat
03-25-2011, 04:44 PM
You are asking for the impossible. You need to build one yourself -- then you will find the angles you need for all subsequent editions.

Well said. This is, after all, Do-It-Yourself. Each person learns at his/her own pace. However, the community is here to help once someone gets started on his/her project.

BTW, Rick did purchase the Warrior plan.

Odd Man Out
03-25-2011, 05:52 PM
BTW, Rick did purchase the Warrior plan.

Never thought he didn't...

I'm always here to help.

When I can.

Jose_Franco
03-25-2011, 08:21 PM
This thread is hot. I want to put my 2 cents, though. I want to build one good jig to build a bike for my wife. However, I knew this would not be possible, if I would not build one for myself first. I think that you should think about building a jig once you have at least one warrior built. Maybe build it as you go, so that the next two will be easier. :) As I said, my 2 cents...