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socialtalker
12-11-2011, 09:07 PM
i was on ratrodbikes one evening and came across this post. the dude was so effusive in his praise for the product i thought i would pass it along. i will likely try it myself next year as i can only afford one bike to be powdercoated.




Awesome Clear-coat in an aerosol
by gtownviking on Fri Nov 04, 2011 12:23 pm

Hey fellow rat-rodders.....I have found the holy grail of clear coats!

http://www.eastwood.com/spray-max-2k-hi ... rosol.html

It's the Spraymax K2 High gloss clear coat. It's a two part clear that you have to break the seal inside of the can then mix by shaking for several minutes. The spray nozzle is fantastic!

I rattle canned my sisters cruiser a while ago and I was severely disappointed in the Dupli-color clear coat. Even after several months of 'curing' in my garage over the summer, the slightest little tap or nick would result in the paint coming off all the way down to the primer.

So after some research, I found this stuff and I have to say, HOLY COW it's awesome!

It sprayed on like a professional gun, the nozzle is fabulous.

High gloss is an understatement as well....

I highly recommend this product...it seriously made up for my amateur paint job.

BTW, I am in no way affiliated with this product or retailer....just a garage bike monkey that is really excited about a 'new discovery' and wanted to share with you all.

http://www.ratrodbikes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=47748



http://www.amazon.com/USC-Spray-Gloss-Clearcoat-Aerosol/dp/B0043B7UQY
http://www.repaintsupply.com/pd_2_part_2k_aerosol.cfm

river
12-12-2011, 10:56 PM
Looks like a good product. they have so really great products at the auto paints store. The new stuff there coming out with is fantastic

socialtalker
12-16-2011, 02:14 PM
really? like what?

TheKid
12-17-2011, 08:03 AM
These products are also available in 2k primers, and 2k single stage urethane paint, as well as 1k basecoats.:

https://www.66autocolor.com/

This clearcoat is expensive, and the weakest links are what's under it. before going through this expense, you should know that it's best to use a 2k epoxy primer over bare metal. The epoxy primer from spraymax company suggests it can go over rust, but don't be fooled. The steel must be rust free and squeaky clean before any kind of paint or primer goes over it. This clearcoat will not be all that long lasting over lacquer or enamel, because lacquer and enamel are not long lasting paint. In the long run, if you use lacquer or enamel paint, it's cheaper to repaint than to use this stuff.
Rust will even bleed through por-15 over time, it's happened to me more than once.

The cheap way that will give good results and a longer lasting paint job than either lacquer or enamel, is to spray etch primer first, then lacquer or enamel primer before your urethane 1k basecoat or 2k single stage topcoat.

Excellent prep is important for any paint job. Skimp on the prep, and even $600 per gallon paint will look like crap.
First, before cleaning your parts, put rubber or nitrile gloves on. Oil from your skin will ruin any paint job. Next, sand all your parts with 80 grit to give the primer some bite. Wipe off all dust with a clean cloth. Wash your parts with warm water and some Dawn dishwashing liquid, rinse completlely, and dry thoroughly. Wipe or spray grease and wax remover, then immediately wipe it off with a separate, clean , lint free cloth. Do not let the grease and wax remover dry before wiping it off. If it does, repeat the process on the same area. (It'll be a little wet after wiping, that's OK.)
Once it's dry, spray 2 coats of epoxy or etch primer. If you use epoxy, no other primer is needed. If you use etch, you'll need 2 coats of enamel, lacquer, or 2k urethane primer. (Urethane is best)
Let the primer dry for an hour before topcoating. For metallic colors, basecoat/clearcoat is easiet to spray evenly. Single stage 2k urethane is fine for solid colors. If using basecoat, you'll have to clearcoat within 24 hours, otherwise you'll have to scuff with 800 grit, clean with wax and grease remover, and respray the base. 3 coats of clear is best.
If you want to clearcoat over 2k single stage, wait 24 hours, then scuff very, very lightly with 800 grit, clean with wax and grease remover, and spray 3 coats of clear.
Another thing about epoxy primer, I don't know what it says on these cans because I use a compressor and spray gun, but most epoxies should dry for an hour before topcoating. You can wait up to 3 days to topcoat without sanding. (Some say 5 or 7 days, but it's better to be on the safe side) At any rate, do not dry sand epoxy before 3 days. If you have runs, wait a day, then you could wet sand the runs out.

TheKid
12-17-2011, 08:16 AM
I posted this pic a long time ago in another thread, but it's just an example of single stage paint. It's glossy, but it's a 2k acrylic enamel. 2k urethane is glossier.
3419

Trike Lover
12-17-2011, 07:42 PM
Wash your parts with warm water and some Dawn dishwashing liquid, rinse completely, and dry thoroughly.

Wipe or spray grease and wax remover, then immediately wipe it off with a separate, clean , lint free cloth. Do not let the grease and wax remover dry before wiping it off. . . .



In some areas I'm completely ignorant, and this is one of them. You say that after washing with Dawn dish soap and water, the next step is to "wipe or spray grease and wax remover"....

What would be an example of this product? I have never heard it mentioned, even when buying primer/paint combos to use after doing auto-body repair work. I've been told not to use Varsol or other mineral spirits, as these leave a residue.

Since I'd like my finished ride (someday, please ***) to have the best paint job I can manage with foo-foo can technology, and knowing that prep work is key, I'd like to incorporate this step.

Thanks,
TL

TheKid
12-17-2011, 09:06 PM
Correct on mineral spirits. Don't use it.
Most auto parts stores carry Rustoleum and Dupli-Color equivalents, they may be called tar and grease cleaners or wax and tar removers, something like that. Auto paint jobbers all carry grease and wax removers.
It's an important step that greatly improves adhesion. Also, don't forget to use a tack rag on the primer before spraying the topcoat. Roll it into a wad and very lightly drag it on your work. Don't push hard, it'll leave a waxy residue and the paint won't stick.
If you're using standard rattlecan products, use etch primer on the steel first, then the regular primer. Makes a world of difference. Don't put topcoats over etch primer, they won't last.

socialtalker
12-19-2011, 01:52 AM
thanks very much for the tutorial, kid!

Trike Lover
12-19-2011, 09:09 PM
Correct on mineral spirits. Don't use it.
Most auto parts stores carry Rustoleum and Dupli-Color equivalents, they may be called tar and grease cleaners or wax and tar removers, something like that. Auto paint jobbers all carry grease and wax removers.
It's an important step that greatly improves adhesion. Also, don't forget to use a tack rag on the primer before spraying the topcoat. Roll it into a wad and very lightly drag it on your work. Don't push hard, it'll leave a waxy residue and the paint won't stick.
If you're using standard rattlecan products, use etch primer on the steel first, then the regular primer. Makes a world of difference. Don't put topcoats over etch primer, they won't last.

Thanks for the excellent advice. Yes, I will be using standard rattle-can paint on the trikes - I'm just not set up for anything else (except a brush). I did some satisfactory rattle-can jobs on body-work repairs and more recently have done some painting on on synthetic rifle stocks. Painting on plastics is somewhat different, but surface prep is still key. Krylon have paints specifically made for plastics ("Fusion" is their 'type name'), for those interested in painting those materials. Regardless, as you've said, the prep work really does make the difference, and my experience painting metal being very limited, I try to pick up all the tips I can.

Cheers,
TL