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View Full Version : Questions about LodeRunner Project



randallburns
03-16-2013, 02:57 PM
I'm interested in building a loderunner. My needs are a bit unusual. I live 6 miles down a rather rough, gravel road. I also have a severely disabled son who lives with me. We both weigh about 250 lbs.


1) I'm not sure if a is the loderunner would handle my road well. I'm wondering if bigger wheels and a front fork suspension would help.

2) I think electric assist would be rather nice(I'm thinking an electrified front wheel).

3) I'd like to know just how long one of these takes to fabricate. A local mechanic will help for $40/hour-but I need to be clear with him what I want up front.

4) My son is unlikely to help peddle. I've thought of putting a passenger seat on for him.Another option is to build a trailer which is essentialy another load runner modde'd to be pulled(And with its own electric assist).

5) I live in an area that gets a lot of rain. The Velomobile plan here are interesting-but thats seems like an involved project that isn't as well established as the load runner.

I'd appreciate thoughts here.

darnthedog
03-16-2013, 06:44 PM
With Pasenger I would direct you to the Loderunner 2- which holds 2 people. Larger wheels is not recommend as the smaller wheels will carry more load. If you go with a hub motor suspension forks are not recommended. Motor will tear them apart. If you truly want suspension and a single rider I might direct you to the Timberwolf with it's mid point suspension over the Loderunner. It would also accomidate your trailer plan and haul a few things as well on top of it. Thick seat padding should smooth out the rough ride otherwise. There is also the Aurora Triike which is very nice suspenion trike.

As to how long it would take varies with the individual. Charlie_R is still building /-modifing his and he uses it for his job delivering papers. I would recommend you get the tools and do it yourself as it is a great way to learn a new skill.

As to your son disablity- Sorry to hear that- what is his issue if you don't mind answering? We all have some one in our lives. And there is no judgement.
Peddling if able to just have his legs move could help his overall health. If mentally disabled peddling also helps them engage in life. So while he may not put any umpf into the peddling- it could still help him in ways that could not be forseen. Who knows he may just like it. Tradetek is working on a recumbent to place his son up front with the controls in the back. Concerns with his son placing his hands in the spoke when the bike was going down the road was his issue.

Welcome to the group and feel free to ask questions. This is a world wide group who have ideas galore.

TexasTuff
03-16-2013, 08:15 PM
Hi Randal, welcome to the group.
Here is a few of my thoughts.

1) Although not as long as your road, I also live on a long private road. About 1/2 mile of sand and road base. Let's describe bigger as fatter. Fat tires will stay on top of the road surface better than skinny tires. As DTD stated, stay with wheels that are the same diameter as the plans call for but fatter tires.

2) Mid-drive motors are a bit more hassle to install but would perform very well on most trikes. Just an option to a hub motor. Hub motor on a front wheel delta won't have as much traction as a rear wheel.

3) Fabrication varies with skill levels. My son and I have built a stick bike in a day. If left to do it on my own, it might take me 3 days. 2 people can work faster than one if they work together well. Others working part time on a project may take several weeks.

4) It is not uncommon to build 2 delta style bikes. Leave the front wheel off the second one and attach it to the rear of the first. Then you have another trike for someone else if ever needed.

5) Nothing is any more difficult than taking things one step at a time. After you've built a trike, all your doing is adding a body to it one step at a time.

Good luck Randal.

George

Ticktock
03-16-2013, 09:55 PM
Hi,
Welcome from China.
Sounds like you put a bit of thought into your needs, which is a good start.
Could I suggest that you take a look at my trike in thengallery, "Person mover" and see if it fits your needs.
I have a feeling it would. (with fatter rear tyres because of your road )
Steve G,
Beijing

charlie_r
03-17-2013, 07:59 AM
As to how long it would take varies with the individual. Charlie_R is still building /-modifying his and he uses it for his job delivering papers. I would recommend you get the tools and do it yourself as it is a great way to learn a new skill.

Welcome to the group and feel free to ask questions. This is a world wide group who have ideas galore.

My build thread here (http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php/5676-Starting-my-Loderunner).

Best bet for you would be to check out Harbor Freight, Northern Tool, or Grizzly for a cheap welder, be it stick or flux core wire feed. You can learn to weld, as many here can attest to. That would save you a great deal of $$ on your builds (yes, plural -- once you start, you won't stop with just one!!). The cost of just 3 hours of professional welding will pay for the welder and associated bits.

I assume (probably incorrectly) that you are in the Longview/Vancouver area. If so do you make many trips to Seattle/Bellevue area? Grizzly has a showroom/warehouse in Bellingham, a short drive further north, so you could see in person what you are buying. HF has many stores in the greater Portland metro area, and there is one in Vanc.

I'll second the suggestion that you look at the Loderunner II, or maybe think about stretching the Timberwolf to fit your needs. Brad's plans are a great starting point for anything you could possibly need in human powered transportation. Clear, easily understood instructions.

If you get stuck with any part of your builds, we are here to help.

Charlie