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pedalpaddle
07-16-2013, 12:49 PM
Hello All,
Sorry in advance for the long winded post....

I'm a newbie here, and to recumbent bicycles, and to building bikes. I can weld, but haven't in a while because I haven't had a welding machine since mine was stolen a few years ago. I'm wanting to start building an airplane, but there always seems to be too much month at the end of the money to get started. I'm considering the step of building a LodeRunner for a myriad of reasons and want to see if I'm totally crazy, or crazy in a good way:punk: (I've got some radical ideas for the uses of a trike) Here are a few reasons for considering a LodeRunner and some questions I have....

1. I'd like to hone and revive my building skills in preparation for welding together an aircraft frame. It's been over five years since I've ran a welder and I miss building from metal terribly. I'd like to practice on something that's NOT going to carry me and my wife 7,000 feet above home. LOL

2. I need to lose a lot of weight. I've been an over the road truck driver for the past ten years, and it's taken a serious toll on my health. I'm close to 300 pounds and can't stand it. I'm an avid kayaker and spend about all of my weekends fishing and generally paddle 10-12 miles a day Saturdays and Sundays. That gives me a pretty good workout, but I need more. I can't just exercise. I need to do something like mow the lawn, or work. I need to be productive or do something while exercising. Walking and running is not real good due to a bad knee and hip from years of rodeo in my youth. I can't take the shock of running or even really long walks. I've loved bicycling my whole life, and recently decided to kayak the weekends and bike through the week. I live in the boonies, so I've got lots of room to ride. My wife bought me a mountain bike (a cheap one) to start, but it's no good. I can't find a seat I like. I've never considered a recumbent, but I'm thinking this may be the answer. How hard would it be to make a little wider seat?

3. I want to USE a trike. I have a rather extensive list of chores to do each day. I have horses and goats on my small ranch here and spend a lot of time moving hay, feed, and other various items around. I looked at the things I'm using my small tractor for and it's mostly hauling things around the place, up the road a quarter of a mile or so, or to one of my neighbors houses (who happen to be relatives). There's no reason, at least I don't think there is, that I couldn't use a cargo trike to accomplish theses things. I basically want a pedal powered light tractor. If I can gear it low enough, I can do all kinds of things with it. I could haul feed buckets on the bike, I can use a trailer to do other things, too. I can load it up with fencing tools to ride the fences to check them and make repairs. If the hauling and pulling goes well enough I'd be tempted to try and pull a 3 gang ground driven reel mower to mow my huge yard with the thing! I can PUSH a reel mower walking very easily, and I think I could PULL three with a low geared trike....maybe. Has anyone ever heard of a trike used as a small tractor? Here's kind of what I'm thinking of, but I'll build it myself. this one claims it needs only 7hp to use. I believe that, as I've been using a walk behind reel mower for a while and it's super easy, NOT like what your grandpa had. http://www.promow.com/products/pro_series_mower.htm#3gang

4. It's only four miles to one of my favorite fishing spots. I have a cart that my kayak fits onto made of bicycle wheels. If I can fashion a hitch to pull it with a trike, I can pedal to the river to launch the kayak, fish and paddle all day, pedal home, and never use any gas. I like the sound of that.

5. I'm a truck driver. I sit behind a roaring engine all night long. I HATE listening to an engine while puttering around my place, too. It's one of the reasons I sold my bass boat and got a kayak for fishing. I hear plenty of engine noise and smell plenty of exhaust. I like my peace and quiet.

6. While my mountain bike just didn't work, I am not ready to give in yet. I can ride a horse for 10 or more hours and walk away like I've never sat on one. I just can't do that with a bike seat anymore! I've tried all of the ones I could find or had been recommended, but the pain wasn't worth the effort, especially when I KNOW I'm going to be bouncing all night in the seat of a big rig for 8-10 hours.

7. I'm hoping to get my wife interested. She'd love biking, I'm sure, but can't ride a bike. She never had one growing up. Always ponies and horses. I let her try out a motorcycle right after we were married 15 years ago and the results weren't good at all. Now, she shies away from ANYTHING two wheeled. She won't even ride a motorcycle with me. I'm thinking I can get her interest up and maybe find an excuse to start another build for her, maybe her own tadpole style trike? She seemed REALLY interested in the videos of the Kyoto Cruisers.

8. The cost!! Holy Cow recumbents are pricey!! I was only familiar with Rans bikes since I LOVE the airplane kits they manufacture. THat's where my recumbent trike search started. I don't want to take out a loan! Additionally, I haven't yet seen a delta style cargo trike I like yet, until the LodeRunner. If I'm going to give this a go, I'm building from salvaged donor bikes!

9. I'm intrigued by the ability to haul weight. That would be so useful to me. I saw where someone used car tires? Would it be possible to use motorcycle wheels and tires? Or are small car tires a better or easier way to go?

10. I LOVE the ability to modify and personalize. I already see some things I'd like to try with the steering and handle bars. I LOVE the pic in the gallery of the delta trike with the little canopy to keep the rider in the shade. It's the one that says No.11 The Bulldog, by SirJoey. That thing is absolutely AWESOME!! That's just about what I have in mind for myself. I can't stop looking at that thing! I can already picture myself riding around here pulling a trailer doing chores with that thing. My neighbors all use those Kawasaki and John Deere mule type side by side ATV's for their work horses. They'll likely think I'm even more nuts than they already do. I'll enjoy not hearing an engine or burning gas and getting a workout, too!

So, does any of this sound reasonable, or am I out of my gourd? Has anyone seen a ground drive mower being pulled by a trike? I don't have time to build right now and I don't have a shop. I always build everything outdoors. My shop is full of airplane stuff and the relegates me to building everything I build outside, but that's OK. I like the outdoors. Right now, I'm thinking I'll work on research and acquiring parts and tools necessary and maybe by the time it cools in the fall and early winter, I'll be able to start. I'd LOVE to have a trike by winter!

So, I look forward to learning about bikes and building them and cutting up old ones. I also am looking forward to lurking on this forum and learning in the process. I've seen some really cool builds here that's really sparked my interest and excitement about the possibilities of a trike of my own! Maybe I'll build a recumbent bike one day for going longer distances, ESPECIALLY if I can get my wife interested on biking with me.

Tradetek
07-16-2013, 03:53 PM
What are your welding skills like and what processes do you know?

I think most of what you said is pretty spot on with the Loderunner, but I doubt that car tires and wheels are the way to go simply because of the weight given the fact that almost everything you intend to do is going to add more pulling weight.

Wow, $985 sounds like a lot for that mower. Bet you could throw one together using a couple reel mowers for a lot less ;)

Since it sounds like you probably have some TIG experience from working with planes, you might want to consider building out of Chromoly so that you can still use 16 gauge tube instead of bumping up to 14 gauge which would probably be the general recommendation given your planned use.

I haven't built one, but I do have the plans for the Loderunner, so that would be my paltry 2 cents.

Bill

Radical Brad
07-16-2013, 04:20 PM
Sounds like a lot of good reasons to jump in a build something!
Glad you joined in the fun.

Brad

darnthedog
07-16-2013, 04:58 PM
First let me say welcome to the group.
The type of wheel you use is totally up to you. I believe Sir Joey was using a donut spare tire rim to build his wheels. I have seem a bike with a reel mower attached as a front wheel but it was a yard ornamate so I don't know how well it functioned. However as a dragged attachment I just don't have a clue, but it does sound interesting. With you airframe building experience I don't feel you'll have any issues with your build. Charlie_R built a Loderunner to deliver newspapers, his includes a freewheel differential to drive both wheels as he uses this in the snow, he also added a mid drive to really lower the gear ratio to pedal the 5 to 600 lbs of paper. He was recently rebuild it as the weight and dropping off side walks was to much for the initial build. So he has incorperated extra support and is rebuilding it. He is considering adding an electric hub motor to give him a bit of boost going uphill. So you may want to consider that into you equation for the future. But sounds like you have a good handle on what you want. A suggestion if you have not gotten any plans yet. Go for the six pack and add the gladiator trike as well as the Loderunner. Maybe the Timberwolf as a light weight alternative when dragging the kayak as you may not what the weight of the Loderunner when off to the fishing hole. As well as any designs you wife might like. You mention the Kyoto cruiser for example. Another suggestion read through the plans twice before starting. The first time is to follow it through the second time make a list of parts as you read. It is much easier that way. Of course feel free to ask question if you want. Someone is bound to speak up.
And by all means post pictures of your progress especially if you have questions. A picture is worth a million words. Have fun.

SirJoey
07-16-2013, 07:56 PM
Welcome to the Krew, PP!

Yeah, bents ain't cheap, that's for sure. Coincidentally, my very first bent was a Rans Stratus,
purchased way back in '85, when Rans was still a very young company.

Over the years, I bought several factory bents before getting into the hobby of building my own.
I only wish I had gotten into the building aspect a little sooner. I could've saved myself several thousand dollars!

Believe me, it's much more gratifying to "brag" that U built it yourself,
than to "brag" about how much money U spent (wasted) on it! :D



**** The Truth Is Out There! ****
http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/7131/sirjoeysigmedij1.gif
(Geezer & Bent Enthusiast At Large)

Petone_NZ
07-17-2013, 05:09 AM
For towing the gang mower it's probably a good idea to drive both back wheels - see the freewheel differential thread here. Else even if you have the power to pull the load, on grass you may simply spin the one driven wheel.

Looking forward to see what you end up building...

Neville

Ticktock
07-17-2013, 06:26 AM
Hi,
First, a welcome from China!
You were right-it was a lengthy post, but interesting, full of good reasons for what you want, and give us all an idea as to your plans. Pity more can't do that, as often we run around in circles for a while until its all worked out!
You made this a bit easy, as you have most of it worked out already.
What type of country is this mowing on (I ran slashing business for years) flat or hilly? Either way, its possible, but I suspect it will be a bit slower than the tractor, but I don't think that will worry you. Load runner with a mid drive will give you all the gear range you will ever need, from full road use to climb a brick wall if you can get traction , just like a 21 speed Road Ranger! (Am I giving away secrets here?) Main concern here would be choice of tyres to get a good allround mix. A narrow bike tyre that we would normally use would certainly have problems on softer ground, and trying to pull. Might leave some pretty deep groves in the good grass too.
As most of your needs for this seem to be relatively short haul, I see no reason why you can't look at using a much wider tyre, about the 20 inch size, with a bit of a grippy tread. As we usually make our own rear hubs, I don't think it would take you long to find a tyre/ rim combination you can add onto an AZ axle setup.
When it comes to the mowing, how important is the speed to the action of the mower--you won't be moving tooo fast I imagine ---slow walk seems reasonable based on past experience with older gear!
All the other Hauling jobs are well within reason, so long as you don't have any hills of any size.
And , in case I forget , because I nearly did forget---you really will need a freewheel diff on this beast, or you will go nowhere on wet grass! NOt a normal differential, as with that you will go no where most times off road! More details later, same for the mid drive.
I would see your load runner doing everything you mention here, with a don't know on the mowing (you can't push 7hp) but it should not need 7hp! Of course, the main point there is regular cutting--much easier to it four times regularly than twice in the same time!
Enough from me for now,
Have fun,
Steve G,
Beijing
Any of the trikes would be ok for your wife, but I would stick with a delta, as she would then be familiar with the load runner, and could use that as easily as you.

Ibedayank
07-17-2013, 04:47 PM
a 20 inch rim will mount a 16inch motorcycle tire

in 26inch rims bicycle tires are available up to 4 inches wide
example... http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/origin8-2011-devist-8er-2-tire-26-x-4-0-wire-bead-belted-black-black

there are many more

the use of a moped front wheel is an option as well
http://bikesandbits-tn.com/data/storage/attachments/4bf680267fd8e3a601d0e61ce2b5b6e5.JPG

pedalpaddle
07-18-2013, 03:42 AM
Thanks guys! I'm learning a lot already. Most of my welding experience is farm stuff with stick welders. I've built flatbeds for trucks, stock panels, gates, etc. I've also got a jeep I play with, so I've welded up home made tube bumpers and other various things for the jeep. I've made a few handy farm implements for my tractor and a few small trailers. I've done a bit of mig welding and currently only have a small 110 mig welder. I think that's what I'll use for a bike. I tried TIG a time or two but failed. LOL. The LodeRunner would be used around the farm and up and down my road going to neighbors, primarily, I think. I live 5 miles from the nearest small town, so I might look at a timberwolf or tadpole trike for longer distances.

Right now, I'm just a little intrigued with the crazy possibles of replacing a lot of I love you walking and tractor work with a cool bike! There sure is a lot to learn, though. It seems simple enough until the research starts. Kinda like airplane building.

The idea of using the trike to pull a reel mower may work and it may not. I can buy the reels for $100 a piece, so I DON'T see myself giving a grand for $300 worth of reel mowers and $30 of steel that's in the three gang mowers!

I KNOW I'll want a little trailer to use for hailing stuff around. That'll be another project.

The area I live in has some large hills, but its mostly flat. There's. only one hill of any size between my place and town, and I don't anticipate it to be a huge problem. I may be in a super low gear to go up but he rest of the trip is pretty flat, so I don't see why a nice trike with 26" wheels wouldn't work for cruising around for fun or errands. (After I'm in shape for it LOL). I used to ride to town on a bike every morning to haul hay and come home, but that was 20 years ago, before I was old enough to drive. I'm thinking I could do it again, especially with a bike with a lot of gears. I used to do it every day on a single speed BMX dirt bike sort of contraption.


Been watching a lot of cycling videos and getting a lot of ideas. Looks like this can be fun and addictive. In addition to a homebuilt aircraft addiction, I Also LOVE home built wood and fiberglass stitch and glue kayaks. Bikes will just be one more thing to tinker with and get addicted to.

I'm really looking forward to the possibility of owning a nice and functional bike that doesn't need a second mortgage!

Thanks for all the info in this thread so far. DEFINITELY gives me a good start for research. I appreciate that.

Also wanted to compliment all the really nice machines in the gallery. Man, you guys do quality work!! Using something so nice that you built yourself is so rewarding, especially when it's as nice as the projects you guys have completed!

pedalpaddle
07-18-2013, 08:09 AM
WOW! Did that last post on my iPhone with the Forum Runner app. A few funny mistakes from the auto correct. Sorry 'bout that.

Ticktock
07-18-2013, 10:05 AM
From the sounds of things all you need is a few plans to read , and guide you in the right direction. Welding won't be a problem, and the mechanical knowledge is OK, so you are off to a good start.
Steve G

SirJoey
07-18-2013, 02:32 PM
...in 26inch rims bicycle tires are available up to 4 inches wide
example... http://www.niagaracycle.com/categories/origin8-2011-devist-8er-2-tire-26-x-4-0-wire-bead-belted-black-black
Yeah, acquiring wide tires isn't really a problem.
Wot I wanna know is, where do U get the wide WHEELS?



**** The Truth Is Out There! ****
http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/7131/sirjoeysigmedij1.gif
(Geezer & Bent Enthusiast At Large)

Ibedayank
07-18-2013, 07:24 PM
Yeah, acquiring wide tires isn't really a problem.
Wot I wanna know is, where do U get the wide WHEELS?



**** The Truth Is Out There! ****
http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/7131/sirjoeysigmedij1.gif
(Geezer & Bent Enthusiast At Large)

http://www.choppersus.com/store/category/3/71/Rims-Only/
http://classic-cycle.de/index.php?lang=1&&redirected=1
http://www.robsson.de/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=54

search for bicycle chopper rims or fatbike rims

up to 4 inch wide rims is that wide enough?

SirJoey
07-19-2013, 10:27 AM
http://www.choppersus.com/store/category/3/71/Rims-Only/
http://classic-cycle.de/index.php?lang=1&&redirected=1
http://www.robsson.de/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=54

search for bicycle chopper rims or fatbike rims

up to 4 inch wide rims is that wide enough?
Kool, thanx! Might be a long time before I can actually use one, if ever, but nice to know,
cuz I had always hoped to build another chopper since selling Chopzilla, but next time around,
I wanted to build a slightly more "practical" version. :)




**** The Truth Is Out There! ****
http://img384.imageshack.us/img384/7131/sirjoeysigmedij1.gif
(Geezer & Bent Enthusiast At Large)

charlie_r
07-22-2013, 07:37 AM
I think it's time for me to comment a bit here.

As designed, the Loderunner does have a practical weight limit for any cargo. Without a bit of trusswork at the joint between the main boom and the cargo box, there can be a lot of flex at that joint. This is what happened to mine. Metal fatigue just ahead of the weld cracked the frame. The trusswork I mention can be something as simple as a long gusset or two on the underside of the joint, using 3/16" plate.

You can move the axle supports back more towards the middle of the box, which will change the front/rear weight distribution, and lessen the tendency for loads to add to the frame flex at the joint between the box and boom.

The 500-600 lb loading Darnthedog mentioned is actually the total weight of trike, load, and me. He also mentioned a hub motor. I think he misunderstood what I am doing. I have a 250W MY1016 scooter motor, not a hub motor. This will be added to the trike as an assist through the mid drive, and will require pedal input. I may upgrade to 450W later, but the mechanicals will already be in place if I do that.

My first iteration of a mid drive gave me a very wide range of gearing, from a top speed of 4 mph, and the ability to --slowly-- climb any hill you could throw at me, all the way to a top speed of close to 40 mph with only a minor manual change of mid drive output gear. Of course that top speed was with a bit of assist from a very gentle (almost flat) downhill slope, and is a bit questionable, as the person who reported may have had speedometer issues. The claim was that he was going 37 in a 35 zone and I was still pulling away from him.

If you are planning for heavy loads, the 20" (iso 406 mm) wheels would be a better idea. With my abuse of the trike, I was constantly having to replace spokes on the original 26" wheels I had on it. The larger wheels don't handle side stresses very well.

In short, with low gearing and a bit of modification from the plans, you can do what you laid out in your plan. As mentioned already, if you have any question, don't hesitate to ask!

Charlie

BigPaul
08-15-2013, 03:20 AM
Here's the thing! I want to go camp-biking and the Lode Runner is the bike for me. I'm 6' 4" and 340 lbs. Now I know if I start riding to work and back that will change, I also know my cruiser weight ALWAYS stops at 270. I am a Gundert and I am proud of it. I REALLY want to build the Lode Runner and a trailer for it as well. But here's my one and only concern, one wheel drive! I do not like it when the rear tire slips, I want two wheel drive limited slip. Does anyone make such a contraption? If not, I have a plan to make my own.

darnthedog
08-15-2013, 09:13 AM
Welcome to the Group BigPaul
As to dual rear wheel drive it has been discuss a few times in the forums. There are a couple method to drive both rear wheels. One is modify the rear end to use an ETG from Samagaga. Another way is to build yourself a freewheel differential. Check out Charlie_R Loderunner. He has been rebuilding his due to overloading with Newspapers and his jumping off curbs. With your total weight of yourself and gear you may benefit from his experience of added trusing to increase the load capacity. But if you search the Loderunner forums for Charlie_R you'll find it easy enough. Please feel free to start your own thread and keep us updated on your build progress. And an FYI most commercial trike only drive one wheel. One wheel freewheels while the other is driven. This is true of the SunX and the Workmen trikes. But your welcome to add dual wheel drive as these plans are great and only you can make it yours. Godd luck and hope that helps.

Ticktock
08-15-2013, 12:51 PM
Hi,
I'm sure Samagaga would be horrified to hear their ETG described as a contraption!!!!! I have one in front of me, and its a very nice piece of work. so , yes, some one does make one of these things, and , yes, you can make your own---hows that for choice?
I agree with you, it would be wiser for you to have this form of "diiff" then not to have it , considering what you want to do.
Bottom line is that the ETG, plus two axles is going to cost money (about $70US +postage from Taiwan)--but it saves a lot of extra work and parts. If I wanted two wheel drive I would use their diff rather than make my own, even when I live in China--its that much easier.
To clear the air on this--its not really two wheel drive , but it is two wheel drive!
The free wheel diff allows the outside wheel to rotate faster in a turn, with the drive going to the inside wheel. On the straight it could be any wheel driving.
But when one wheel slips, it immediately locks, and both wheels drive, until one can push harder than the other, and we go back to one freewheeling . Wheel spin is impossible unless it is both wheels spinning at the same time--that's takes some doing with peddle power!
Charlie R would be our resident expert in this direction--I don't think he has had a wheel spin problem since converting to a free wheel diff.
The basic Loadrunner should do everything you need, especially if you add in or change things as per these posts--its a very versatile layout, that can be adapted to almost anything.
I can give you details of a mid drive set up that will never leave you looking for a gear, from 8GI to 120 GI on 20 inch wheels. And its not hard to do.
But for your extra requirements--farm trailers, mowing etc, you will need wider tyres than normally used, and there is a slight penalty here in drag, but its not that bad if you watch the tyre pressures.
Steve G

charlie_r
08-16-2013, 06:20 AM
Actually, I HAVE had a wheel spin problem, in 6" of snow, and no weight in the box. Other than that, I've had no problem in any other condition. Loose gravel, sand, mud (as long as it not a bottomless pit!), or any other limited traction surface. Only problem has been on ice, and that was steering, not going. A judicious application of brakes, just enough to change the weight distribution, and the steering grabs again. On less than ideal surfaces, the separate brakes do help a little for steering, but not much due to the long moment arm between the braking axle and the front wheel, except on ice, where the front tire can slip a bit.

I would encourage the use of 203mm disks for the brakes if you are hauling any sort of a load. 160's will get hot! With that heat, your pads will cook, and you will be replacing them fairly quickly.

Ibedayank
08-16-2013, 10:51 AM
Charlie what size tube did you use to build yours? Is it the same as the plans call for?

charlie_r
08-17-2013, 07:09 AM
I used what was available at my local yard. 1-1/2" 14 ga. 2" 16 ga as called for in the plans would have been a special order out of St. Louis, with an additional $25 shipping charge. I think the 16 ga would have cracked or bent long before the 14 ga did.

I had reinforced what I thought would be trouble areas, but I guess I didn't think long enough about that, or didn't consider some of the vertical forces involved.

Had I been using the trike just for small loads as it was designed for, I doubt I would have had any problems at all.

Ibedayank
08-18-2013, 12:36 AM
I used what was available at my local yard. 1-1/2" 14 ga. 2" 16 ga as called for in the plans would have been a special order out of St. Louis, with an additional $25 shipping charge. I think the 16 ga would have cracked or bent long before the 14 ga did.

I had reinforced what I thought would be trouble areas, but I guess I didn't think long enough about that, or didn't consider some of the vertical forces involved.

Had I been using the trike just for small loads as it was designed for, I doubt I would have had any problems at all.


So using steel that was LIGHTER in total weight is stronger? I have 2 inch 16 gauge tube and with it spanning 10 feet with my 225# in the middle there was NO
measureable flex in that piece. Now to prove my point take some 1/4 inch slices and try to bend them... now take some 1inch wide slices and try to bend them against the one inch wide part not that flat like you would bend sheet metal. take pictures and post your results and do it cold no heat to help you bend it. Larger tube will always be stiffer and stronger against bending then smaller tube. With larger tube you also have the ability to spread the stresses over a larger surface. Being you did not follow the plans as put forth by Brad yours is not a example to judge the design fairly now is it?

1.5x1.5 .083 aka 14 gauge tube is 1.580 pounds per foot

2.0x2.0 .065 aka 16 gauge tube is 1.67 pounds per foot
so much for the heavier tube with the 1.5 inch tube theroy

BigPaul
08-18-2013, 03:24 AM
HELLO PEDAL PADDLE! Welcome to this forum! You are like a Brother from another Mother. In 1976 I finished welding the frame for a Gyro Copter to get my Welder Certification, I later finished the Gyro and flew it for two years. I to have the weight problem, but I'm 370, (Down from 426!) and my heart is beginning to complain. DEFINITELY gotta put a stop to that. Admittedly I'll look pretty funny, for a while, peddling my lard ass to and from my Job! But, hey, I gotta start some where! I am becoming quite a Scuba Diver and would prefer to NOT look like Shamu in a wet suit! I am also considering a canopy, I have been a Skin Cancer Patient for 31 years. No sense in provoking more cancer problems. I look forward to riding with you and many others one day. Maybe I can haul my Scuba Gear with me and use that to my advantage as well! I'm looking forward to achieving 270 lbs. At 6' 4" that will make me a lean mean, Trike riding, machine!

charlie_r
08-18-2013, 12:00 PM
So using steel that was LIGHTER in total weight is stronger? I have 2 inch 16 gauge tube and with it spanning 10 feet with my 225# in the middle there was NO
measureable flex in that piece. Now to prove my point take some 1/4 inch slices and try to bend them... now take some 1 inch wide slices and try to bend them against the one inch wide part not that flat like you would bend sheet metal. take pictures and post your results and do it cold no heat to help you bend it. Larger tube will always be stiffer and stronger against bending then smaller tube. With larger tube you also have the ability to spread the stresses over a larger surface. Being you did not follow the plans as put forth by Brad yours is not a example to judge the design fairly now is it?

1.5x1.5 .083 aka 14 gauge tube is 1.580 pounds per foot

2.0x2.0 .065 aka 16 gauge tube is 1.67 pounds per foot
so much for the heavier tube with the 1.5 inch tube theory

As I said, I used what was available. I didn't want to pay the extra shipping at as I said $25. Forgot to say that is PER PIECE. $48 for each piece + the shipping charge was a little much. My only other choice for 2" would have been 1/4" wall structural tube.

http://www.omegasteel.com/pdf/weight-per-foot.pdf

There was NO flex in the frame itself. Period. The welded joint is where it broke, however it was NOT the weld itself, rather right next to the weld. I will admit I may have weakened the area while cleaning up the weld with the flap wheel.

I have tried to bend the 1-1/2" 14 ga tubing by securing one end of a 15' long piece, with the fulcrum/bending form at 3' from the secured end. I couldn't do it. Would not bend. Flexed, yes, but sprang right back to original straight when pressure was released. I suspect that I would have had to use a 20' long extension to be able to put the desired bend in the tube.

Remember, I'd been loading this trike with WAY more than it was designed for. So In essence I expected some problems.

Could you explain further your 1/4" and 1" bending examples? Are you talking about trying to bend the walls? Not the same thing AT ALL, as bending a structure made of this material. I can bend the walls of the slices with a pair of channel-lock pliers, no problem. but try to bend a long straight piece? No way. Not the same.

Think about this: To bend without heat a long section of square tube, the outside wall (of the bend) has to stretch, while the inside wall has to compress. The sidewalls will show both stretch and compression, usually resulting in bulging outward in the compression area. The inside wall will buckle inwards in the bend area due to the compressive loading.

Ibedayank
08-18-2013, 03:40 PM
Charlie.. no was designed for 2 inch not 1.5
2 inch is STRONGER then 1.5
1.5 will twist long before 2inch will... aka curb jumping
Now I will say that this has come at a perfect time as mine is not yet finished and I think
I will cut a gusset and weld it it in where the main boom meets the cargo box. Mine is made from 2 inch 16 gauge

front tube that meets the boom I did not do as the plans called for but left enough to completly cover the main
tube so there was no need to cut a cap for it. This should be stronger as there is more surface area to weld.
With gussets there should be no straight lings with the frame as cracks develope in straight lines lot easier then curved

it was $70 for my 20 foot stick and I had to travel 100 miles round trip to get it

Ibedayank
08-18-2013, 03:44 PM
BigPaul
how good are you at welding/cutting steel?
I have an idea to make the rear frame stronger I will get it drawn up and posted tonight