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rbscycle
08-11-2013, 09:22 AM
Everyone:
I have a Gear Inch Calculator. It's OLD SCHOOL ... DOS! However, it does Internal Hubs as well. It does 3, 5, and 8 Internal Hubs, coupled with an *.ini file you can masage quite a bit. OF COURSE IT'S FREE!!!!

I also have some SpreadSheets that do the Gear Inch Calculations, also Free!

Pelegrin
02-08-2017, 04:04 PM
Hey hombre
What gear ratio to use, I am building a HighRoller Short Wheelbase Recumbent Bike and would love to travel as fast as possible
Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated

darnthedog
02-09-2017, 01:15 AM
Hey hombre
What gear ratio to use, I am building a HighRoller Short Wheelbase Recumbent Bike and would love to travel as fast as possible
Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated

I have used the following online calculatorhttp://www.sheldonbrown.com/gear-calc.html without issue.

rbscycle
02-10-2017, 10:18 AM
"As Fast As Possible" is relative to how strong and how heavy you are. How much power do you have in your legs. If you're building and trying to find out what gearing you should put on your build. If you have ridden in the past, think of what you have ridden, what was comfortable for you, gear wise, and start from there. For the "Gear Inch Calculator", I used my own. I didn't like the Sheldon Brown one. It's actually pretty simple to use a Spredsheet... Wheel Size x Crank / Sprocket, will give you a good estimate. Happy Building!

pegasus
02-10-2017, 11:46 AM
If you using this calculator

http://cycleseven.org/bicycle-gear-inch-calculator (http://cycleseven.org/bicycle-gear-inch-calculator)

It let you calculate either pedaling cadence or speed on different gear combos

rbscycle
02-11-2017, 01:18 PM
Interesting discussion. Cadence is relative to the rider. What's a comfortable cadence for one may not be for another. Also Pedal arm length. Pedal arm length comes to bear as it relates to a fulcrum of leverage, but has no effect on the revolution of one complete revolution of the crank. For a given size crank (number of teeth), one revolution is one revolution regardless of the length of pedal arm. However, the longer the pedal arm, the more leverage, but also the harder to push!

Twinkle
02-12-2017, 06:27 AM
Interesting discussion. Cadence is relative to the rider. What's a comfortable cadence for one may not be for another. Also Pedal arm length. Pedal arm length comes to bear as it relates to a fulcrum of leverage, but has no effect on the revolution of one complete revolution of the crank. For a given size crank (number of teeth), one revolution is one revolution regardless of the length of pedal arm. However, the longer the pedal arm, the more leverage, but also the harder to push!

It should be easier because of the increase of the foot revolving circle ( mechanical advantage of the greater circle and the distance travelled )

Cadence varies due to the type of fitness as most road biker use a high cadence ( 90 plus ) where novices try and mash and not get far .

Recumbent legs are different to DF legs as they also use DIFFERENT MUSCLES - its all a learning game

regards emma ( still learning )

bambuko
02-12-2017, 08:51 AM
I have moved to 150mm cranks (totally disregarding recommendations for 6' 4" rider :) ) and it has transformed my recumbent cycling - love it, but... my largest chainwheel is seldom used now! Spinning is the name of the game!

rbscycle
02-13-2017, 09:35 AM
I agree. It SHOULD be easier because of the increase leverage. However, as bambuko pointed out, moving to a SHORTER pedal arm increased the spinning effect and he now has a more enjoyable ride. The longer pedal arms, in spite of their increased leverage, hurt the knees and so many Recumbent riders have moved to shorter pedal arms. Math vs Reality. Like I said before, very interesting topic