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sandman
10-22-2013, 03:10 PM
Hi all
Well my saw arrived this morning (Tuesday) after ordering online sunday evening, and I have to say for a refurbished saw I am impressed, I ran a square over it to check alignment and it was on the money however the degree scales I would say are just indicators but maybe thats my engineer mind being picky. I have tried one straight cut through 1.5" square 16swg box and the cut was true in all planes, plenty good enough when you know the welding is going to pull the metal anyway.
I thiink that its a tool that will give plenty of good service as long as its treated as a saw and not a guillotine( seen more chop saw blade die that way than any other abuse given to them)
Thats about it for now
regards
John
PS .Thanks again Dan for the link to it

trikeman
10-23-2013, 01:13 AM
That saw really is a beauty, and the refurbished ones don't cost much more than what I paid for my wood cutting miter saw.

stormbird
11-07-2013, 06:48 PM
Hi


Glad you started this thread as we had sort of hijacked the other thread which is not fair to the zombie asking for help.

So I have added two legs to my saw that span my workmate with 2 pieces that sit between the jaws , just needed to take the feet off and recess the bolts.



http://s20.postimg.org/f0a6uspjh/DSCF1607_sm.jpg

I though it was slightly out in both vertical and square to the fence but it was fairly easy to adjust and you can probably see the blade has had some use.

Also does your sound like a bag of nails ? well a very powerful bag of nails , 2000w is approx 2.6hp ! got to treat this thing with some respect !

then I came across my first problem

I want to cut 5 spokes for a vigilant style spoked car wheel :-

http://s20.postimg.org/apviz7kgd/wheel_spokes_5.jpg

Help my saw can't cut these angles :rolleyes4:

I assume I need to make some packing that will go between the steel and the fence and take up some of the angle ?
Say packing 24' and saw set at 30' will give me a cut of 54' ?

Am I right ?

is there a preferred way of doing this to get the best accuracy etc. ?

paul

DannyC
11-07-2013, 07:15 PM
Hi Paul,

Can the saw not be set to cut at 36 degrees with the work piece held against the rear fence, then reversed for the other cut?

http://s5.postimg.org/my73d0d0j/72_degree_cut.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/my73d0d0j/)

Regards,

Dan.

stormbird
11-08-2013, 09:21 AM
Dan

For a minute there I almost had a DOH why didn't I think of that until I looked at it more closely.

You are effectively cutting to chunks of 36' from a 90' angle, now 2 x 36' is 72' from 90' leaves 54' so this is the opposite of what I need ?

The angle you show at 72' is actually 54'.

So at this point either my parents or yours needs to go back to the schools we were at and ask for their money back ?

regards Paul

ps I am sure someone with a brain will be along shortly to sort this out ?

pps or I may have to draw it !

Tradetek
11-08-2013, 11:22 AM
Use a shim, or do 2 cuts at 27 degrees on each side.

Bill

stormbird
11-08-2013, 02:15 PM
http://s20.postimg.org/apviz7kgd/wheel_spokes_5.jpg



Bill

If you imagine the vertical line is the saw blade and in that position it is at 0' it will only swing around to 45' and you have to pass through 45' to get to 54' ?

Where does 27' come in to it ?

regards Paul

DannyC
11-08-2013, 02:24 PM
Hi Paul,

Sorry, it was late and I was rushing to reply before I toddled off to bed so maybe I made a schoolboy-error and need to go back to Skool.

I will look again.


Regards,

Dan.

DannyC
11-08-2013, 03:56 PM
Hi Paul,

Can you not cut a packing piece at (for example 45-degrees) and use this as "pseudo-fence" and then set the saw at 9 degrees past the right-angle?
45 + 9 = 54 leaving a 36 degree cut on the end of the work-piece? Then flip the pieces over to the other side and do the other cut, then trim the overall length of the piece at the other end to suit?

Probably a really clumsy description, but I think I know what I mean, even if I am articulating it badly. :-(

http://s5.postimg.org/3oduysv6r/36_degree_cuts.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/3oduysv6r/)

Sorry if I have misunderstood the problem and have arrived at yet another non-solution.

The packing piece angle and the other angles can be altered to suit whatever combination works best for you.

Regards,

Dan.

sandman
11-08-2013, 04:18 PM
Evening all,

Paul
mine sounds the same but it came with a new blade, remember the cut you want to do is outside the scope of the saw and any fencing or clamping you do you need to think about what will happen if the blade grabs, what direction things will move and are you in line with nasty sharp bits. accuracy of angle? well how precise do you want, a cheapo bevel will work or you could go to using a sine bar and slips for total control but bearing in mind its going to be a welded joint 1 degree either way is not going to be a disaster over the lengths you are cuttin just remember steel is greyish the pink bits are fingers haha
regards
John

stormbird
11-08-2013, 05:21 PM
Dan/John

Yes Dan my though was exactly as you have draw it with an angled fence taking up some of the 54' and letting the saw add the rest.

however I am no engineer and so wondered if there was a better/safer way of doing this ?

I am more used to a bench wood saw where I have more control over the depth and can build sliding trays that run the piece through the saw at an angle of my choosing rather than being limited to what the saw can achieve on it's own.

regards Paul

Tradetek
11-08-2013, 05:27 PM
I understood that Paul. I was suggesting that you take the 54 degrees and divide it into 2 = 27 degrees. Then make two cuts per side. You will have to cut side A, then B, then A, then B. But it should work. The only pain is securing it, but that is what clamps and wood are for.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/Rage_Cuts.jpg

Bill

stormbird
11-09-2013, 05:28 AM
Hi all

Bill your idea would create a couple of problems the main one being making 4 cuts per piece that is 4 chances to make the wrong cut x 6 pieces !

Also clamping would be a big problem for the second cut on each side ?

So did a bit of googling and turned up a couple of jig ideas , I think I will be doing this :-

http://s20.postimg.org/p7aco8i8d/cuttingjig.jpg

making a 90' jig that can be clamped to the left side of the original fence with the work on right side of the new fence , making 2 cuts at 36' will give me my 72'.

Only problem is I cannot easily have a stop to ensure all the pieces cut meet the blade in the same place ie. so the blade cuts across the piece where the centre line meets the centre line of the work ? maybe need to thing about work position a bit more ?

all for now Paul

Twinkle
11-09-2013, 06:04 AM
Stupid answer here , if you are building a wheel why not use a piece of tube at the centre , then weld all five arms to it then you get a nice hole in the middle and you only need to make one jig .

PS :taz: dont shoot the messenger :clown:

regards emma

stormbird
11-09-2013, 09:11 AM
Emma

Well that is not a stupid answer ..........just close :joker::joker::joker:

That is the method used here :-

http://www.ratrodbikes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=68533&p=661483#p661483

however there is a lot of grinding and guessing with this method.

Brads method in the Vigilante plans on the face of it looks easier to do and has a bit less guess work when getting the spoke assembly into the rim.

It only proved troublesome when I though , my new saw can cut them.............

Which should have made it quicker and the parts more identical than if they had been cut by hand.

But hey this is learning and fun !

regards Paul

stormbird
11-09-2013, 09:15 AM
I think that its a tool that will give plenty of good service as long as its treated as a saw and not a guillotine( seen more chop saw blade die that way than any other abuse given to them)
John

John

Sorry but what does " as long as its treated as a saw and not a guillotine " mean for us non engineer types ?

regards Paul

Twinkle
11-09-2013, 09:22 AM
press gentle dont force it through :taz:

thats what the four ducks told me to say:dunce2:

regards emma

DannyC
11-09-2013, 12:42 PM
Hi Paul,

I think that as long as you let the saw blade do all the work and take its own sweet time to cut through the work-pieces you will be fine.
Don't try to apply too much pressure just let it make its own way through and you should get a good result. The way the blade works is that it "nibbles" at the material removing very small chunks and just like you and me if we force too much into our mouths we choke. Like the tortoise..."Slow & Steady" wins the race in this instance.


Regards,

Dan.

sandman
11-09-2013, 06:08 PM
John

Sorry but what does " as long as its treated as a saw and not a guillotine " mean for us non engineer types ?

regards Paul
Hi Paul, I think everyone has answered for me haha, but you would be suprised at the number of people I have seen slam a blade into metal and the subsequent shattered blade.
regards
John

stormbird
11-16-2013, 02:41 PM
Hi all

Well my immediate problems of using this saw are behind me .... Oh no there not etc etc etc [ panto season :)]

Made this jig [ second version ] 20" wide and 10" deep , the pieces of steel are 1" x 1" x 8" , it is clamped to the fence both sides of the blade.

http://s20.postimg.org/dejha60ct/DSCF1608_sm.jpg

and :-

http://s20.postimg.org/cdj8l1jd9/DSCF1611_sm.jpg

I just have to apply light finger pressure to the steel to hold it in place but may relieve the end farthest from the saw blade so I can add a clamp and not have to hold it at all.

It cuts 36' in one half of the 1" x 1" steel then I reverse the piece and make a second cut 2 x 36' = 72' just what the doctor ordered.

http://s20.postimg.org/45hb01rgt/DSCF1609_sm.jpg

Shame about the holes but they can be filled if they are not cut out when it gets fitted to the wheel :-

http://s20.postimg.org/wz2lqoqbx/DSCF1610_sm.jpg

Still some way to go but impressive accuracy and I have not had to file them at all , they just need the paint removing so they can be welded.

I suspect I can also weld the inside corners , Brad had 8 spokes and could not get the stick in there.

sandman
11-16-2013, 03:30 PM
Hi Paul
your solution is how I would have set it up but I would have added a removable peg stop in the 90 degree fence for the second cut to prevent any possibliity of drag in to the blade, but thats me thinking all the bad things that may happen :)
It might be worth making a proper 90 deg fence rather than use all that expensive wood, it dont grow on trees you know !!!!! oops it does dont it, disregard that, I didnt say it, it was Arno the duck said it.
regards
John

stormbird
11-16-2013, 06:13 PM
John

When the first cut has been made the non cut side is still full length and can butt up against the wood fence where the blade has sliced it , if I then hold the opposite end with a clamp against the fence base that should be enough ?

What is
a proper 90 deg fence ? :confused: you can't just go around throwing out these statements willy nilly , we are 90% amateurs on here and only look clever and knowledgeable to the TV couch potato crowd :joker:.

ps you are getting as bad as Emma for doing this , and I have had to tell her off today as well :jester:

Twinkle
11-16-2013, 06:27 PM
Hey Paul
I am going to tell the ducks what you said:taz:

Its lucky really that John and I are only 5 miles apart ( or is it that we are 5 miles apart ):builder2:

Its nice to have mates that KNOW what they are talking about .:confused:

That's what his ducks said :alien: If you want to know more about the hubs just PM me .:evilgrin:

FrankCrank
11-16-2013, 08:17 PM
....nice work Paul - should look good on top of your Xmas tree :)

DannyC
11-17-2013, 07:59 AM
Pleased to see you are getting on well with your purchase Paul.

Regards,

Dan.

Twinkle
11-17-2013, 09:25 AM
Hi Folks ,

SCREWFIX has opened a new outlet in Newhaven . On special offer today

RAGE evolution 3S compund mitre /sliding saw at 89.99 , New boxed with a laser light ( ho ho ) with 12 months warranty

So just guess what I have bought . Needed a DIYer to build it first

regards emma

sandman
11-17-2013, 11:32 AM
John
What is ? :confused: you can't just go around throwing out these statements willy nilly , we are 90% amateurs on here and only look clever and knowledgeable to the TV couch potato crowd :joker:.

ps you are getting as bad as Emma for doing this , and I have had to tell her off today as well :jester:

hi Paul
My take on the 90 degree' fence would be to have it attached to the horizontal fence in a manner that it can be adjusted from left to right,my choice would be of metal construction as I seem to lack skills for woodworming :joker:, I personally clamp everything having seen fingers ripped off by people thinking holding by hand will do !!! now to the nitty gritty... (90% amateurs on here) by that do you mean 90% of the zombies are amateurs or that of the 100% they are professional 10% of the time ? I assume you have done an in depth study on this matter and used the usual weighting of survey statistics ?
I cant imagine for one moment you would toss this statement out Willy Nilly :surprised:. I am very lucky to have lots of big boys toys but I do knife and fork it when the machines are busy earning my crust of bread, and the people here are the true engineers that I have the utmost respect for
regards
John
ps I guess I will be getting a call from Emma soon to build her saw :builder2:

Twinkle
11-17-2013, 11:40 AM
Ken and I have built it thanks John but you are welcome to come and set it up usual tea and biscuits and some crumbs for the ducks

stormbird
11-17-2013, 12:10 PM
Emma

I had some difficulty with the rear fence it seemed I had to bend it a little to get it square both sides of the blade.

Also wear eye protection ! mine seems to spit metal chips into the face , not somethink I had noticed when cutting wood.

stormbird
11-17-2013, 12:18 PM
John

Hear what you are saying about fingers and will modify mine to allow a clamp on the work piece.

I have a few car wheels to spoke so will leave mine as a one job jig at the moment , but who knows what I will need in the future !

90% or 100% ? no idea but I am just a simple garage hacker with a liking for dangerous tools !

DannyC
11-17-2013, 01:12 PM
I am so envious of you all, with workspaces and tools to match.
As you all know, I cheated on my StreetFox by enlisting my brother for the build at his factory in Cheltenham.
But I want to be a "real boy" (just like Pinnochio) so I have "dived-in" and bought myself a little pre-loved MIG welder today on Flea-Bay (I haven't told the "guv'nor" yet........ will need to pick my moment or...:taz: may ensue).
It's nothing fancy, just a GAS endowed Clarke 105 (it had to be a CLARKE - of course) with a big CO2 bottle included.

I was in Screwfix with my son today buying bits to repair his Central Heating (all fixed now :)) and they had that RAGE 3 deal there; and it was sitting on top of a super looking portable workbench, I was sorely tempted, but us pensioners have to watch the pennies.

Regards to all,

Dan.

ChadClancy
11-17-2013, 01:39 PM
The inside corners would be easier to weld if you could cut a thin kerf about the width of your electrode. This could be done after welding on the face.

sandman
11-17-2013, 01:54 PM
I am so envious of you all, with workspaces and tools to match.
As you all know, I cheated on my StreetFox by enlisting my brother for the build at his factory in Cheltenham.
But I want to be a "real boy" (just like Pinnochio) so I have "dived-in" and bought myself a little pre-loved MIG welder today on Flea-Bay (I haven't told the "guv'nor" yet........ will need to pick my moment or...:taz: may ensue).
It's nothing fancy, just a GAS endowed Clarke 105 (it had to be a CLARKE - of course) with a big CO2 bottle included.

I was in Screwfix with my son today buying bits to repair his Central Heating (all fixed now :)) and they had that RAGE 3 deal there; and it was sitting on top of a super looking portable workbench, I was sorely tempted, but us pensioners have to watch the pennies.

Regards to all,

Dan.
Oh Danny boy
not bursting into song, dont worry.
You are now well set on that slippery slope into total zombieism, if thats a word ? for someone that was told by SWMBO that another trike was verbotten, you either have a silvery tongue or no regard for the repercussions of your actions :joker:enjoy playing with your new toy and I will bet you have the rage within a few months( the saw, not the film)
John O' Gin Palace
Maker of trikes, salmiaki and Limoncello

stormbird
11-17-2013, 01:59 PM
Dan

The Clarke MIG's have a good reputation and the weld quality with CO2 will be better than gasless MIG.

ChadClancey

I weld with TIG and probably will just add a large tack so I feel I have added some strength if I can get the gas cup in there.

stormbird
12-04-2013, 03:08 AM
Hi all

Seen this on offer at Screwfix ?

http://www.screwfix.com/p/evolution-rage3b2102-210mm-compound-mitre-saw-230v/20332#

Seems to be a less butch version of the saw I bought ?

Neil B
12-04-2013, 05:21 AM
Nice price. But it's not worth the greif I would get, "what do you want with another tool, you don't use all the ones you've got" etc etc etc :sleep1:

Twinkle
12-04-2013, 01:10 PM
Oh Neil

You have the wrong technique , would you like a xyz as I was thinking of getting a zxy , less grief and you both get something ,

regards emma

Neil B
12-04-2013, 04:57 PM
I can't really justify it to my self either, but that technique is worth thinking about in the future :evilgrin:

DannyC
12-04-2013, 05:46 PM
When announcing my 2014 welding intro course (a mere 175); I did mention the 7K+ I had paid for my wife's Psychology Degree OU courses over 3 years and the further 750 I paid for her Post-Graduate counselling courses.

She decided not to pursue an active Psych or counselling career shortly after completing these engagements, so I had little opposition to my modest spend really. :-)

Guilt-trips are wonderful things. LOL.

Regards,

Dan.

ChadClancy
12-04-2013, 06:58 PM
Danny,

Something tells me she gets plenty of use out of her education right at home.:evilgrin:

DannyC
12-05-2013, 08:34 AM
I think you might be right on that score. :-)

Tradetek
12-09-2013, 02:22 PM
So after finding the Rage 3 saw here in the US at Lowes as well as online, I started digging into it a bit more and realized that it has a metric arbor hole, which locks you into their blades, and I didn't care much for that and decided to go another round. Since their stainless steel blade is capable of like 5000 RPMs, I started looking for US standard blades and standard miter saws, and decided on the Lowes house brand Kobalt 10-in 15 Amp Sliding Compound Miter saw. (http://www.lowes.com/pd_358938-46069-SM2507LW_1z0yhs9+1z140vv__?productId=3512785&Ns=p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNs%3Dp_product_qty_sales_dollar|1%26 page%3D1&facetInfo=Kobalt) for the saw, and then picked the Lenox 10" Steel Cutting Blade (http://www.lowes.com/pd_367710-28303-1809129_0__?productId=3550662&Ntt=lenox+10+inch+steel+blade&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dlenox%2B10%2Binch%2Bsteel%2Bbl ade&facetInfo=). And boy do I have a smile on my face right now!

Attached is a shot of a 3.5in x 3.5in 5/16" wall square tube that it cut through like butter. Now I baby my saws and let them do the work at their own pace without me forcing them. So this tube would have taken a while to cut with my big DeWalt chop saw, but this combination cut through it in about 15 seconds after my initial hesitations and trepidations that the blade would shatter and possibly kill me...

As is heard about any dry cut saw, including the rage, the cut was nearly kerf free and cool to the touch. I'm really impressed and given the angles it will easily do, I think I'm going to be happy for a long time.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0003.jpg

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0004.jpg

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0005.jpg

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0006.jpg

Bill

DannyC
12-09-2013, 02:47 PM
That's great Bill, I am really pleased that you have found a combination that you are happy with and that works so evidently well. :-)

Regards,

Dan.

FrankCrank
12-09-2013, 08:37 PM
...hey Bill, nice new toy you got there, very jealous. Looking at that square tube you're cutting up, are you planning on making some sort of monster trike ? :)

Tradetek
12-09-2013, 10:20 PM
No, I received an ultimatum to get my workshop out of our garage so both our cars can get in. Right now one bay is for my workshop, 1 has a car, and one has a trailer for our off-road motorcycles. So, with my back issues, I don't want to take the risk of trying to move around the trailer (and can't bear to sell it and the bikes due to sentimental reasons) so I got a winch and am making a hitching post to pull the trailer up into the garage with.

My shop is gradually moving down to the basement.

On the saw note, for anyone contemplating a similar setup, I was really surprised at how easily the blade cut through the thick walled tube, and how little dust there was from it, granted I had a shop vac attached to the exhaust port, but still, my chop saw just can't compete. Now I have to decide if I sell the chop saw or not...

Bill

Tradetek
12-10-2013, 12:26 AM
Okay, if you have a disability that seriously affects your productivity and are looking for a good way to spend your tool dollars, I definitely recommend this route.

Just ran a cut through 4" wide 1/2" plate in 10 seconds and although I had to turn it around once, I quickly ran through a piece of 14" wide 1/4 inch plate.

Definitely a happy camper right now.

Bill

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0007.jpg

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/18993675/Pictures/IMG_0008.jpg

Tradetek
12-12-2013, 10:50 AM
Bill not as happy today... The Lenox blades, even though rated for a higher RPM than the miter saw I purchased it with dulled really quickly. Basically I got through about what you saw in my last pictures and then quick.

The Lenox techs basically said that even though it is rated for that RPM, don't use it any saw that is not dedicated to metal cutting even though none of them go any higher than about 2000 RPM.

Go figure... back to Lowe's.

Bill

MrMatt
12-12-2013, 11:12 AM
Bill not as happy today... The Lenox blades, even though rated for a higher RPM than the miter saw I purchased it with dulled really quickly. Basically I got through about what you saw in my last pictures and then quick.

The Lenox techs basically said that even though it is rated for that RPM, don't use it any saw that is not dedicated to metal cutting even though none of them go any higher than about 2000 RPM.

Go figure... back to Lowe's.

Bill

I am disappointed to hear that. I had a metal cutting blade on my list for this weekend's visit to the HDepot. Seeing the cuts you had made made me envious and thinking that my mitre saw was finally join to get put to some good use.

M@

DannyC
12-12-2013, 11:47 AM
Sorry to hear the Saw & Blade combo has not lasted as long as expected Bill.

I know that the proprietary Rage3 blades are expensive (c.25 each) and I have no real idea what their "life" is like or how quickly they blunt compared to your experience with the Lenox blades or how the blade price compares?

Having said all this, you have possible given your combination a really hard trial of strength to overcome with that plate steel for sure.

I hope that a new blade and less-challenging loads will restore your happiness in your purchase.

Regards,

Dan.

Racer46
12-12-2013, 01:06 PM
My Oshlun blade requires sharpening after about 20 cuts on the 14ga. tube I've been using. The local sharpener has been charging me $12 to do my 52 tooth blade. I have noticed that after sharpening the blade is still not as good as when it was new. Maybe he isn't using the correct tooth angle.

sandman
12-12-2013, 04:25 PM
I am guessing its a carbide tipped blade,its possible that your not feeding the blade in fast enough causing the tips to rub rather than cut, not easy to feel the optimum infeed by hand but sparks are a fair indicator of too slow an infeed.
regards
John

Tradetek
12-12-2013, 11:04 PM
Interesting Sandman, I'd been assuming that it was best to use just enough pressure to let the blade do the work without pushing on it, I mean I was applying pressure, but not "forcing it". I haven't decided yet if I'm going to just return it or exchange it.

Either way, I did talk to the Lenox support guy who kept saying that you needed to use the blade on a "Professional Metal Cutting Saw". He just kept saying that even when I pointed out that the miter saw I was using had as many amps and hp as any of the metal saws on the market and was running below the blades maximum RPM rating. About the only thing of value that I got out of him was that the blade was for structural steel, which meant anything over 1/8" thick and not for thinner materials. He said that my experience with the 1/4 and 1/2 inch was the blades sweet spot, and didn't have any indication of why it would be working great one second and then immediately fail the next. This was NOT a gradual decrease in performance. He also didn't have an explanation of why it didn't say anywhere on their web site or product literature that even though the max RPM's are suitable for use in a miter saw, it should only be used in a dedicated metal saw.

Either way, it was a $65 blade, so it is going back and I don't think that I'm going to be buying any more Lenox saws after this because I was also disappointed when I figured out that the hole saw kit I bought from them wasn't true to size. All the hole saws are off by about 1/8 inch, which is pretty significant when you are trying to cut a 3/4 or 1 inch hole.

Bill

DannyC
01-11-2014, 06:29 PM
Oh my goodness!
My dear wife wants the flooring changed in the living room and hallway.
The bamboo planks must be removed and a new laminate floor must be put in its place.
She frog-marched me to the flooring store and forced me to spend over 500 pounds on the new flooring materials.
All my old saws are blunt, I think I will have to buy a nice new saw in order to do the work properly.
I wonder what it could be?

Dan.

Twinkle
01-11-2014, 06:48 PM
I think Screwfix is cheaper than machine mart at the moment

regards emma

sandman
01-12-2014, 04:06 AM
All my old saws are blunt, I think I will have to buy a nice new saw in order to do the work properly.
I wonder what it could be?

Dan.
Oh dear, what a pity, how sad...... is that enough sympathy Dan ? :smartass2:

John

stormbird
01-12-2014, 04:35 AM
Dan

Hope you have got some space mine needs an area about 3ft x 3ft x 2ft ! it's massive !

DannyC
01-12-2014, 07:29 AM
Thanks all :-)

As an impoverished person I opted for the B-Grade refurb from Evolution Outlet.
It is the S300 210mm Sliding Mitre Saw. 99.

Should be here before the flooring arrives.

Dan.

go1000go
01-12-2014, 07:32 AM
Hi Dan

Double whammy there go you.

Surely in your last post you got it wrong

Should be here before the flooring arrives.

Should be here before the STEEL arrives. lol

FrankCrank
01-12-2014, 10:42 AM
...this is gonna sound real negative, so apologies in advance.

Why on earth would a hacker need such an exotic piece of kit?

Does anyone here produce bent's on an industrial scale, to justify such a purchase ?

Hacksaw, angle grinder, file, what more do you need ?

Just back from (late) new years party............lots of beer, excuse my rant........................

Twinkle
01-12-2014, 11:10 AM
...

Why on earth would a hacker need such an exotic piece of kit?

Does anyone here produce bent's on an industrial scale, to justify such a purchase ?

Hacksaw, angle grinder, file, what more do you need ?
.

I bought one , great for cutting logs as well ( had to justify it )
not sure how I can justify buying the grindette cut-off stand except that it was cheap
bought a 18v drill as well , that's the pension gone for a week .

regards emma

FrankCrank
01-12-2014, 12:29 PM
just back from another beer or 2 at the party, hangover tomorrrow for sure.

Emma, my intentions are true, hate to see folk squander hard earned dosh on folly, I served an engineering apprenticeship back in the 70's/80's and firmly believe in acquiring basic hand skills. Others may differ in opinion, such is their right. I also believe that welding on bike scale tubing can only be done with something other than stick/mig, but thats another contentious subject............

DannyC
01-12-2014, 01:54 PM
I think there is a definite difference between "need" and "want" here that Frank has readily identified.

Of course nobody "needs" these tools (our forefathers never had them).
Elbow-grease and simpler tools allied with a keen eye can get the same result.

But, having these tools can make a long boring job (e.g. cutting up flooring) a lot easier.
I laid all the existing flooring in all of the rooms in this house with manual tools only but that was before the hip replacement; and now some of the "moves" that used to be OK are now "not recommended".

So, I have slipped this saw in "under the cover" of the household DIY job. I feel only a small amount of guilt.

Frank, you are right It is an extravagance. But an itch has been scratched and no-one has been hurt. :-)

Hope the hangover is a mild one.

Best wishes for your belated Happy New Year.

Regards,

Dan.

Twinkle
01-12-2014, 03:48 PM
I think there is a definite difference between "need" and "want" here that Frank has readily identified.

Of course nobody "needs" these tools (our forefathers never had them).
Elbow-grease and simpler tools allied with a keen eye can get the same result.

But, having these tools can make a long boring job (e.g. cutting up flooring) a lot easier.
I laid all the existing flooring in all of the rooms in this house with manual tools only but that was before the hip replacement; and now some of the "moves" that used to be OK are now "not recommended".

So, I have slipped this saw in "under the cover" of the household DIY job. I feel only a small amount of guilt.

Frank, you are right It is an extravagance. But an itch has been scratched and no-one has been hurt. :-)

Hope the hangover is a mild one.

Best wishes for your belated Happy New Year.

Regards,

Dan.

Well said Danny but our fore fathers never laid laminate flooring , cut up bikes and did so much DIY . These power tools are becoming the hammer , saw and chisels of the past .

hope the hangover is not too bad Frank , and BTW beer is only rented

regards emma

DannyC
04-18-2014, 12:08 PM
As a belated "nod" to Frank and his admonitions regarding the over-use of power-tools when the good old-fashioned way works I would offer this example:

In removing the weld material and vestiges of 40mm pipe from the hinge I have salvaged from a folder I initially attacked one of the hinge-plates with an angle-grinder and was disappointed with the rate of material removal, the mess and the end result (this is the hinge-plate on the left). For the second side if the hinge I mounted the hinge in a vise and used a hacksaw to carefully cut the majority of the material off (see the oval ring of sawn-off tube & weld material on the right hand side, and then all I had to do was a minor clean-up job with the grinder.

Yes, the cutting took a little while, but in fact it was easier than only using the grinder as well as much more "controlled" and much more satisfying.

http://s5.postimg.org/5xqla8dpf/P1020073.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/5xqla8dpf/)

So, Frank, thanks for the reminder (now heeded) it may indeed be like one's father always said "The old ways are basically good tried & trusted ways Son".

Regards,

Dan.

Tradetek
04-18-2014, 02:04 PM
What kind of disk were you using in your grinder? Over here we can get .045" disks that cut through the steel very quickly and then clean up with a flap disk.

Bill

DannyC
04-18-2014, 02:52 PM
Hi Bill,

For the sake of clarity let me add that there was no attempt to "cut" with any discs in angle grinders for this clean-up.

If I had been trying to cut, I would use a 1mm disc (of course).
But, the tubes had already been cut off to within 3 or 4 mm and the work-piece did not ideally lend itself to being "trimmed" with such a disc so on the first side the thicker "grinding" disc was used (where lateral pressure can be gently exerted) to grind away and remove metal down & back towards the base-plate of the hinge.

Hence my change of tack for the second side of the hinge where after careful and close-cutting with the hacksaw I had only 0.5 - 0.75 mm of material to remove at most and removing with the edge of a grinding-wheel was a breeze.

I hope this clarifies things.

Regards,

Dan.

Tradetek
04-18-2014, 07:47 PM
Yep, context is everything ;)

Looking forward to see how your build progresses. Will be nice to some new design challenges and the process to work past them.

Bill

tomelect
04-18-2014, 10:44 PM
I use a drop saw for cutting metal ( the blades are cheap) and a mitre saw for wood.

Tom