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Cookie32
01-17-2014, 06:31 PM
Finishing off a tomahawk lowracer. I've only been on test rides, no longer than 10 minutes so far but I have noticed whenever I ride it mŷ knees seem a bit tender. I have had other injuries and acts but my knees have never been a issue before. Does anyone else know any pain in the knees from riding? Once I get off there is no pain. Not sure what to make of it. Maŷ just be my body still adjusting to ride recumbent.

TexasTuff
01-17-2014, 06:52 PM
I assume you are new to recumbents.
This copied from the Bacchetta site "Extend your heel to the pedal. When in this position, you should have a comfortable, straight leg. After this, drop down to the ball of your foot in your pedaling position. You should have a slight bend in your knee at this position."
Riding a recumbent uses a different set of muscles than an upright bike. Take you time in building these muscles. Ride in a lower gear than normal to help keep the strain off of you knees. A high cadence (spin fast) when climbing hills helps also. If this continues to be a problem, there are a couple of aids that help some. Knee Savers (http://www.kneesaver.net/) have helped me and you may find some less expensive brands on ebay. Shorter cranks promotes faster cadence and has help many.
Don't go to hard while you are adjusting, especially when climbing hills.
Good luck.
George

Tradetek
01-17-2014, 09:18 PM
Swap out your crank arms for ones that are shorter. you probably have 170's on there right now. try a set of 155's.

Bill

Radical Brad
01-17-2014, 10:46 PM
It's easy to get rolling in high gear on a bent, so practice downshifting before you stop.

Brad

Cookie32
01-18-2014, 01:46 AM
Thank guys, I'll put the info to use. See where I end up. It sound like a combination of pedal location and crank length.

stormbird
01-18-2014, 04:01 AM
Hi there

Depends where pain is as to what will help it :-

http://www.bentrideronline.com/archives/tipstricks.html

Brad this really ought to be a sticky somewhere it comes up at least once a year ?

go1000go
01-18-2014, 06:05 AM
Great topic, covered before for sure.
However I cannot recall the link you provided Paul, thanks for that.
At the end it suggested another topic, here it is
http://www.bentrideronline.com/archives/2000May/gene_pedaling.html

Interestingly leg suck which I thought was just for those low down trikes, can also be an issue for highroller spirit type machines according to the author, and it had not occurred to me.

So thanks again for the thread, guess I need to make some heel slings for all the promised advantages

Ticktock
01-18-2014, 08:48 AM
For nsome strange reason unknown even to Zombies, knee pain is not unusual when riding a recumbent--especially in the early days.
problem is to be found in crank length, although as an engineer I see no reason for this.
Itb really does pay to use shorter cranks on a recumbent, despite the logic that says it should make no difference compared to an MTB
!55 is a good starting point, and you really will notice the difference for the first couple of kilometres or miles.
Most alloy cranks will allow you to drill another hole (on a 170 you will get about 153 max ) and to re-tap . Now before you go wild with the drill, make sure its the right size, (or slightly smaller-not bigger) and that you can get a left and right hand thread put in the new holes. A lot of bike shops do not have the taps to do this, so consider buying your own, then you can charge the bike shop when they get stuck! (my taps are on permanent loan to the local bike mechanic, who charges the local bike shop, and we split the money!
Honestly, I o not know the reason, but long cranks cause knee pains. I used to get pains after about 20 k. Switched from 170 to 153 (give or take) and have no problem since.
Depending on your legs, even 155 might be too long. The racing guys have basically got it worked out that 110 is about the shortest you can use with any advantage.
You do spin faster-it does affect (slightly) the gearing, but the pain goes , or , better said, does not happen.
so yes--shorter cranks are almost a must for most of us. There is a website somewhere that provides a calulater for crank length, but , in my oppion, it comes up with really SHORT cranks.
But it does offer a bit of an explanation to the problem.
Whatb is a surprise is that such a small change is so noticeable, and has such a large effect on comfort.
I rode Post Office Bikes for many years, and did notice the same thing happening on an Upwong, because of the Postmans habit of setting the seat very low to help with constant stop and start with a loaded bike, so there is a common point with the old upwong, except that most people don' t put the seat that low on an upwong!
Hope that helps,
Steve G,
Beijing

Ticktock
01-18-2014, 09:19 AM
Hi Tim,
Almost a separate subject, but the effect of leg suck happens (or could happen) on all bents. Itb really stems from the sitting position. On an Upwong (remember I am in China and we can't have upwrongs because they can't say wrong right) if you put your foot down, nothing much happens, as the body can take that sort of movement. But start laying back, as on an upright, and unless you are really double jointed, it does not take too much to get into a really painful position, even if your leg is not being dragged under the bike. There is always two sides to a story, so here the flip side is that a really quick hit at the ground can pull you out of much more trouble than you could ever survive on an upwong, but it has to be quick--learned from experience.
I have tried then"normal" toe clips and straps no my Delta, and found them to be more of a nuisance than a a help. Yes , they did push and pull, and encourage spin as opposed to mash, but they did not keep the foot on the pedal on bumps, and then it was almost impoosible to re clip without stopping.
Heel straps may be the answer, but on a two wheeler, first priority has to be in being able to un clip when needed--or have retractable training wheels.
I am thinking along the lines of a combination of the PowerGrip straps and heel straps to solve both problems in one go, but only on the trike--not the two wheeler.
Steve G

FrankCrank
01-18-2014, 09:48 AM
....Steve makes a very good point about using shorter cranks. I myself would advocate these, especially being as I'm vertically changed at 5'-7". On my tadpole trike I currently use 140mm, 40t, single speed crankset, recently bought in UK. These feel great for getting that spinning action going, and are a good match for my 3-speed Sturmey Archer hub.

One idea I have yet to try, is shortening a 170mm crankset 'zombie style'. Drill the new holes, then use a pair of old pedal spindles to cut the new threads, one LH & one RH. I planned to cut some flutes with angle grinder in the 'zombie taps' to aid cutting and allow swarf to dissipate, just as in regular tap & die sets. Should work OK I reckon, but have yet to try for real.............

Twinkle
01-18-2014, 11:21 AM
....


One idea I have yet to try, is shortening a 170mm crankset 'zombie style'. Drill the new holes, then use a pair of old pedal spindles to cut the new threads, one LH & one RH. I planned to cut some flutes with angle grinder in the 'zombie taps' to aid cutting and allow swarf to dissipate, just as in regular tap & die sets. Should work OK I reckon, but have yet to try for real.............

Been using pedal spindles as taps for ages to reclaim threads on cranks ( refurbs )
flutes (3) with a thin 1mm cutter works well :)

regards emma

Ticktock
01-18-2014, 11:31 AM
Hi Frank
If you can keep,the heat down when grinding the "Taps" this will work for alloy. Use as fine a grade cutting disc as you can get so as to keep a good cutting face on the "tap", and for the limited use you need it for , the "tap" will work fine . try kerosene as a lubricant (works for nearly all alloy jobs, and dose not stain if that worries you!)Problem you may face is that you may need two peddal spindles to get a full depth thread! One to start, another to finish
Lets start a new question here --how do you spell pedals--seen so many variations I am confused!
Steve G
And too lazy to reach for ma dictionary

TexasTuff
01-18-2014, 11:53 AM
I have read many long threads on the subject of crank length over the last 4 years and I collect information and weigh the yeas and nays. In the end I usually through out all the logic and base my decisions on human experiences, as I have on this subject.

The vast majority of all people whom have made the switch from long cranks to short cranks have stuck with them and reported improved performance and a lower level of pain in the knee. Not all, but most. That was enough reason for me to try.

Some of the reasons that have stuck with me are:

When upright riders need their highest level of power they stand up keeping their knees in a straighter (strongest) position. On recumbents, with our back to the seat, apply the most power when our knee is bent (the weakest) position. Short cranks keep our knees at less of an angle.
Most of the people whom have made the switch report riding one or more gears lower and spinning faster. If you are already riding your lowest gear and you put on shorter cranks, you have made your problem worse. You may need even lower gears and spin faster to notice a difference.
If you have advanced medical knee problems nothing will help except to get your knee fixed. After that, riding a recumbent is great rehab.

Just some of my observations. YMMV

Wikipedia says pedal.

Ticktock
01-18-2014, 12:21 PM
Thanks--now I can pedal instead of peddel or peddle--at least now know what I am doing!
You are right--one gear lower and spin faster sums it up fairly well, with less effort, and less pain.
And it still beats most things in top gear
Steve G

Cookie32
01-19-2014, 11:32 AM
Found this link regarding crank and proper size versus height. I fall into the 83cm plus range which puts me on a 170mm crank. I'm thinking a drop to 160cm should be a good start. Time will tell. I will put this into action this week. I moved my crank toward me by about 4cm feels better already.

http://myra-simon.com/bike/cranks.html

darnthedog
01-19-2014, 12:13 PM
Please realize that is for Upright bicycles. You may want to take the suggestion by the group who ride recumbents over a guy riding standard cycle. Especially as you are already suffer knee pain. Just a suggestion.

Cookie32
01-19-2014, 12:54 PM
....Steve makes a very good point about using shorter cranks. I myself would advocate these, especially being as I'm vertically changed at 5'-7". On my tadpole trike I currently use 140mm, 40t, single speed crankset, recently bought in UK. These feel great for getting that spinning action going, and are a good match for my 3-speed Sturmey Archer hub.

One idea I have yet to try, is shortening a 170mm crankset 'zombie style'. Drill the new holes, then use a pair of old pedal spindles to cut the new threads, one LH & one RH. I planned to cut some flutes with angle grinder in the 'zombie taps' to aid cutting and allow swarf to dissipate, just as in regular tap & die sets. Should work OK I reckon, but have yet to try for real.............


How is single speed treating you. I'm seriously considering getting rid of the triple. I'm just a bit worried I'll miss have the option. Especially as I'm still working at getting my cycling legs back. Worried I might be pushing my bike without it.

darnthedog
01-19-2014, 01:20 PM
Will
I would leave the triple till you have your riding legs back and make sure of what gearing is going to work for you. The Triple does give you options. I'm not Frank but my personal experience is I never change the front gears unless I really have a heavy climb. But going back and forth to work I am always on the largest gear and looking for larger to go faster. I only swap the rear gears around but generally leave it either in the mid gear of highest gear as I need the mid gear to start with and jump to the highest to go down the road. Your Terrain and bicycling physical shape will tell you what you need to do. If it hurts back off. If you feel you can stretch it a bit further or feel your not hardly pushing to get going then increase the gearing. Your body and physical shape will determine what you need to do. Reducing the Crank length is a first step. Then build your self up. Measure out a mile. DO that for a week with what ever gearing feels good. Next push to two mile for a week. Then push to 4. Once you get going and get into shape you look back at these questions and wonder that you had not realized how out of shape you were in. My first 5 miles took me 45 minute to get to work. Now it take me 20 to 25 minutes depending on lights and traffic. If I had the gearing I might make it faster. But I don't have it yet. Plus I really need the Timberwolf finished and cover to really get her up to speed. Unfortunately I'm not as fast a builder as I am a rider. Things get in the way. My problem. But my advice is sound as it was given to my by a guy who ride 10 miles a day regardless of the cold. My bones don't like the cold. So I am out of shape again. But again my problem. Hope that helps.

Cookie32
01-19-2014, 01:46 PM
Will
I would leave the triple till you have your riding legs back and make sure of what gearing is going to work for you. The Triple does give you options. I'm not Frank but my personal experience is I never change the front gears unless I really have a heavy climb. But going back and forth to work I am always on the largest gear and looking for larger to go faster. I only swap the rear gears around but generally leave it either in the mid gear of highest gear as I need the mid gear to start with and jump to the highest to go down the road. Your Terrain and bicycling physical shape will tell you what you need to do. If it hurts back off. If you feel you can stretch it a bit further or feel your not hardly pushing to get going then increase the gearing. Your body and physical shape will determine what you need to do. Reducing the Crank length is a first step. Then build your self up. Measure out a mile. DO that for a week with what ever gearing feels good. Next push to two mile for a week. Then push to 4. Once you get going and get into shape you look back at these questions and wonder that you had not realized how out of shape you were in. My first 5 miles took me 45 minute to get to work. Now it take me 20 to 25 minutes depending on lights and traffic. If I had the gearing I might make it faster. But I don't have it yet. Plus I really need the Timberwolf finished and cover to really get her up to speed. Unfortunately I'm not as fast a builder as I am a rider. Things get in the way. My problem. But my advice is sound as it was given to my by a guy who ride 10 miles a day regardless of the cold. My bones don't like the cold. So I am out of shape again. But again my problem. Hope that helps.


Great advice, thx.

savarin
01-20-2014, 09:52 PM
I am a firm believer of the smaller cranks method, logically the longer cranks should place less stress on the knees but I think that the increased angular motion the knees go through with long cranks in the recumbent position is what causes the problem. That and the ease in which you can really mash the pedals all combine to screw up the knees.
I run a 155 on my low rider and that has helped greatly in my knee pain but I really have to remember to spin as my inclination is to power on as hard as possible, as soon as I feel myself doing this I drop down a cog and start spinning again.
I've drilled and tapped new holes in ally cranks and also torn the pedals out the cranks, spinning helps to prevent these problems as well.
These modded cranks are still going strong on the lowrider.
http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php/4364-Triple-chain-rings-on-BMX-cranks?highlight=

FrankCrank
01-21-2014, 12:11 AM
...another option is to use a one-piece crank. Over this way they are usually shorter, around 150mm, and do the job just fine. Had one on my trike for first year or so and no issues, and since converted it to 3-piece just as an experiment............

Cookie32
01-21-2014, 02:03 AM
This is the new crank I've ordered. Should be here tomorrow. I'm quite interested to see he difference.

http://r.ebay.com/9zzJGp

Twinkle
01-21-2014, 10:19 AM
Looks good , I have ordered a lot of bits off the guys up there , good service , quick delivery , and good products .

regard Emma

Cookie32
01-22-2014, 04:33 AM
Looks good , I have ordered a lot of bits off the guys up there , good service , quick delivery , and good products .

regard Emma

Yeah they're saved in my favorite sellers. I'm doing my part to keep them in business,lol. I looked for that stoker stem on my bike for ages. They're the only ones in the UK that had one for under 49 pounds. They had a excellent adjustable one as well oh at it was only 20 pounds. Love it love it love it.

Cookie32
02-04-2014, 10:24 AM
Ok, new 150mm crank installed. Added some toe clips because my feet kept sliding off the pedals. There is a world of difference, first the twinge I felt in the knees are gone. Had to move the bottom bracket back a few cm's as well. Training myself now to raise my cadence instead of muscling my way thru which I'm sure was part of the reason for the pain. That was my last legit issue building the bike. Time to take it apart and paint the thing. The last major job, hooray!







http://s26.postimg.org/y2vkrhn11/image.jpg (http://postimg.org/image/y2vkrhn11/)

darnthedog
02-04-2014, 11:09 AM
Yeahhhh another successful build.
So what color or colors are you going to paint with? I can hardly wait for the finished photos. But please take your time in painting it correctly. Nothing like a bad paint job to ruin a perfectly great bike. But like welding and assembly of these plans you can always use a wire wheel and start over to make it perfect for you. Anyway congratulation on your project and making it ride-able.

trikeman
02-04-2014, 02:37 PM
When I first got into riding a recumbent my knees bothered me until I found the right distance for how far to put the seat back from the pedals. Even when you get that right, take it a bit easy for a few weeks and don't mash going up hills.

go1000go
02-04-2014, 03:02 PM
Training myself now to raise my cadence instead of muscling my way thru which I'm sure was part of the reason for the pain. That was my last legit issue building the bike. Time to take it apart and paint the thing. The last major job, hooray!

Hi Cookie

Glad you seem to have the problem in hand now, just curious if you are measuring your cadence, £6 job to create a counter and easy to do, might be worth getting it all rigged up before paint if you are.

I appreciate it is another job before paint and I am always far too eager to paint too soon, but as Darnthedog says, try not to rush at this point.

Have fun
Tim

Cookie32
02-04-2014, 03:29 PM
@go1000go
I literally gave no idea what my cadence is at this point. I was waiting to treat myself to a nice bike computer once I had finished, but that was before I was turned onto how important cadence is to recumbent riding. I can get a cheap one that will serve purpose for under a tenner so I can find out where I stand. Not sure entirely what sort of numbers I should be aiming for. I'd be in the overweight and out shape category, if I'm being honest.

@darnthedog

not totally sure on the paint scheme I have watched a few videos on prep. I have everything ready for a good strip and clean. I have purchased primer and gloss black, but the black was for a top coat over two other colors I haven't yet decided which. Something like what's in this video.

http://youtu.be/MaPh2j4bdLI

stormbird
02-05-2014, 04:02 AM
Hi there

You can get any bike computer to give a cadence reading ? like this :-

http://www.63xc.com/martink/cadence.htm

Could I ask where the rings removable on those cranks ?

and yes I have used them folks before , got a nice rear 20" wheel with disc to use on my python.

trikeman
02-05-2014, 10:12 AM
Its not quite accurate as a cadence meter, but you can measure your cadence with a simple stop watch or timer that most cell phones have now. Set your timer for a minute and start pedaling. Count the revolutions until the timer goes off. If you do that a few times, it will give you a pretty good feel for what your cadence is. Some people with true cadence meters obsess too much about it, and watch the meter far too much.

Cookie32
02-05-2014, 10:47 AM
Hi there

You can get any bike computer to give a cadence reading ? like this :-

http://www.63xc.com/martink/cadence.htm

Could I ask where the rings removable on those cranks ?

and yes I have used them folks before , got a nice rear 20" wheel with disc to use on my python.

I'd have to check but I'm sure the crank is a one piece. Meaning drive side all in one as the set as a whole is a three piece. I just confused myself, lol. I don't believe the chain rings can be removed on this one without drilling. I was intending on doing exactly that with a cheapo bike computer I picked up from wilko's today but the weather has been less than agreeable. I found a good video on youtube, with basically the same info.

Cookie32
02-06-2014, 02:41 AM
The computer I picked up only allows inputs in tire size by the inch, not sure entirely what to put in. Anyone have a clue?

go1000go
02-06-2014, 02:54 AM
Hi

I managed to follow this instructables
http://www.instructables.com/id/Very-Easy-Cadence-Meter-For-Your-Bike-12/step8/Computer-Set-Up/

I had to use 5 magnets due to the limit on the counter was 3333.

This is the halfords computer I used
http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_72 0953_langId_-1_categoryId_165741

When I bought it, it was on offer at £5.99

Not sure how you were planning on using your computer/counter, hope this helps

Tim

stormbird
02-06-2014, 04:57 AM
The computer I picked up only allows inputs in tire size by the inch, not sure entirely what to put in. Anyone have a clue?

Now you are making my head hurt ! they are cheap enough ? find another ?

Does it show KMH and MPH ?

It does say this at the bottom of the article :-

You can do the same thing with an mph readout if you prefer, but I will leave the maths to you...

SO at 10 rpm you will travel 1 mile ?

[crc x 10 x 60 ] / 63360 = 1

crc = 63360/600

crc = 105.6

I am sure someone who knows what they are doing with maths will be along shortly to point out the error I made in this !!!

Look here http://www.cs.unca.edu/~boyd/touring/cadence/cadence.html hmm different figure to me by a lot time for breakfast me thinks

More thoughts :-

Move the sensor and magnet to the crank.

The first instinct is to have 1 MPH = 1 RPM. However, typically you will be spinning up at around 100 RPM, and most bike comps can't really deal with a speed of 100 MPH (or faster), so since it probably reads in tenths, I'd shoot for the RPM reading to be in tenths (IE 10.0 MPH = 100 RPM)

The math is ridiculously simple.

You want 10 RPM to be equal to 1.0 MPH on the comp. Since 1 mile = 5280 feet, and an hour = 60 minutes, in 60 minutes your pedal (which it thinks is a wheel) turning 10 times a minute will turn 600 times. So you want to set up a circumference where 600 times = 5280 feet. That means a circumference of 5280/600 = 8.8 feet. Since I think all comps want to be set up in millimeters, convert that. 8.8 feet = 105.6 inches = 2682.24 millimeters.

Set the comp to a wheel circumference of 2682 mm.

Tradetek
02-06-2014, 09:51 AM
I still don't know why you guys/gals are making these, when you can buy a cadence counter for 5-10 pounds Cadence Sensor (http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=sr_st?keywords=cadence+sensor&qid=1391694569&rh=n%3A318949011%2Cn%3A461108031%2Cn%3A461182031%2 Cn%3A550013011%2Ck%3Acadence+sensor&sort=price)j

Surely you are spending more than that after you buy the computer and and magnets?

Bill

Cookie32
02-06-2014, 11:26 AM
Thanks guys but I seem to have picked up the one cheap computer where the tire input isn't made in mm. I can only make tire size selection from 5 to 30. Not the end of the world the computer has an rpm option, I was just trying to get more out of it than that single function.

go1000go
02-06-2014, 02:46 PM
I still don't know why you guys/gals are making these, when you can buy a cadence counter for 5-10 pounds Cadence Sensorj

Surely you are spending more than that after you buy the computer and and magnets?

Bill


Not in the UK unless someone can show me.


Paul, seems right

WillC looks like you need to head out for a refund from Wilko, then take your cash elsewhere.

stormbird
02-06-2014, 06:28 PM
Thanks guys but I seem to have picked up the one cheap computer where the tire input isn't made in mm. I can only make tire size selection from 5 to 30. Not the end of the world the computer has an rpm option, I was just trying to get more out of it than that single function.

Will is that figure say radius or diameter ?

if that is so it is as easy as measuring your wheel ?

Tradetek
02-06-2014, 07:25 PM
Click the words "Cadence Counter" in my message below...

Use your computer's calcuator to convert from mm to inches...

Bill

Cookie32
02-15-2014, 04:28 AM
Well finally got out on the main road. With a fair bit of trepidation from whether the bike would hold up, mainly pulleys and small bits and finally having a car zooming over my shoulder with wreckless disregard. Only one car actually came closer than I would call comfortable but otherwise nothing to report there. I know for sure how out of shape I am. To my surprise after the first few cars passing I felt comfortable mentally and settled in. Had a few hills to face, I stopped on the first one out of exhaustion and nervousness even though I was progressing up it fine. At no time was there any pain in my knees, so I'll chalk the smaller crank and toeclips up to a victory. I was sucking wind like there was no tomorrow in sight. Thats purely down to being out of shape, and most of my ride was on a gradual incline. Just have to start planting my tail in the seat and riding everyday the weather permits. I'll tell you what, it's the best feeling in the world when you feel you've accomplished something. I didn't land on the moon but it's still one small step for me.

go1000go
02-15-2014, 06:14 AM
Good to hear that at least somebody managed to get out there on a bike.
Good to hear the cranks are good.

Another modification to consider http://forum.atomiczombie.com/showthread.php/8384-Water-bike?highlight=

Too windy for going out here.

Enjoy

Twinkle
02-15-2014, 08:45 AM
Good to hear that at least somebody managed to get out there on a bike.

Too windy for going out here.

Enjoy

If this wind keeps up I was thinking of putting a sail on the trike
electric power one way and wind power the return journey

Come to think of it some rider use wind power any way !!!!!!
regards emma

stormbird
02-15-2014, 09:05 AM
I'll tell you what, it's the best feeling in the world when you feel you've accomplished something. I didn't land on the moon but it's still one small step for me.

That sounds good for a first outing.

Do you ever go to the Mildenall Cycle Rally ?

Been there last couple of years with my KettWiesel & chopper bike , lots of good rides around there

Cookie32
02-15-2014, 09:25 AM
That sounds good for a first outing.

Do you ever go to the Mildenall Cycle Rally ?

Been there last couple of years with my KettWiesel & chopper bike , lots of good rides around there

I haven't joined the rally yet. My bike was just a frame during the last years rally. Shame on me as it literally takes place a stones throw from my house. I will be checking it out this year. It's on my short list once I get my bicycle legs under me. I don't think I do much in the way of recumbents, but I don't know for sure. Just what I've heard.

stormbird
02-15-2014, 03:49 PM
I don't think I do much in the way of recumbents, but I don't know for sure. Just what I've heard.

Hmm not sure what you mean by this ?

It is a camping weekend for me where I meet up with friends and go out on social rides into the countryside.

Every think is very informal and mainly concerned with getting a tea and cake about every 5 - 10 miles and hope there is no rain:)

We ride to Ely or Bury or Wicken Fen via as many cafes and church halls as possible.

Cookie32
02-15-2014, 03:58 PM
I meant I'm wasn't sure what they had in the way of events for recumbents. As they do races and other things like that. It sounds like a good time the way you describe it, count me in. Plus who doesn't love a camping trip where you can sleep in your own bed. As the rally is so close and all.

stormbird
02-15-2014, 06:14 PM
Will

There is nothing specifically recumbent , the racing is either grass track all ages upwongs or there are some Audaxs leaving from the site.

http://www.mildenhallrally.org.uk/startpage.htm

there is a cycle jumble and trade stands and DTEK recumbents have a display etc

Cookie32
02-25-2014, 02:44 PM
Does anyone know where to find knee savers/pedal extenders? The cheapest I've found them online is 19 pounds a set which I think is a bit dear for what they are. Happy to pay up to 10 or 12. More than that I might have to get resourceful.

Twinkle
02-25-2014, 03:09 PM
Hi Will
problem is, there is a lot of work that goes into them , and of course left and right handed internal and external threads if your pedals have long shafts you might be able to space then and get 4 mm , not a lot but it might help .
regards emma

Cookie32
02-25-2014, 03:33 PM
Good idea, I'll try that in the morning. Might just be enough to get by. Thanks Batwoman, lol

Ticktock
02-26-2014, 05:44 AM
Hi,
THe only peddle extenders I have seen are for 1/2 inch pedals--chances are that yours are 9/16 if its a 3 piece crank.
If I was you I would simply opt for shorter cranks, see what happens when you ride, and only worry about wider pedals when you find you need them.
Its relatively easy to drill and re-tap 170/175 alloy cranks at around 155/153mm. Does not sound much difference, but the results will surprise you.
Do not compare with an upwong--its totally different--I need 170mm on an upwong, but can still walk after 50 Km non stop on a bent with 155mm cranks.
I was getting slight pains after 20 Km on 170mm.
Hope that helps, and saves a lot of hunting, and a bit of cash.
Steve G
Australia

bambuko
02-26-2014, 02:04 PM
Hi,
... I was getting slight pains after 20 Km on 170mm...
Steve G
Australia

Was this because you were being silly boy and pushed more than you should have?
I used (to start with) have this problem and considered shorter cranks, but than decided that if I am sensible and use gears (as they should be used) to keep spinning instead of mashing I should avoid knee problem.

I am puzzled by this short crank business (because afaic even with short cranks, you can damage your knees if you mash in a wrong gear).

I have no knee pain despite being decrepit and arthritic - spinning in the right gear just means that I am often slower ... but no knee pain.

Cookie32
02-26-2014, 02:12 PM
Hi,
THe only peddle extenders I have seen are for 1/2 inch pedals--chances are that yours are 9/16 if its a 3 piece crank.
If I was you I would simply opt for shorter cranks, see what happens when you ride, and only worry about wider pedals when you find you need them.
Its relatively easy to drill and re-tap 170/175 alloy cranks at around 155/153mm. Does not sound much difference, but the results will surprise you.
Do not compare with an upwong--its totally different--I need 170mm on an upwong, but can still walk after 50 Km non stop on a bent with 155mm cranks.
I was getting slight pains after 20 Km on 170mm.
Hope that helps, and saves a lot of hunting, and a bit of cash.
Steve G
Australia

ive already switched to a 150mm crank. I'm getting around quite well, for just having started. My leg motion isn't in a straight line. I seem to be pushing inward on both sides which makes my knees a bit tender toward the end of my ride. I'm sure that's the issue, just a matter of moving my pedals out 13 to 30mm as a rough figure to get my leg extension straight.

Ticktock
02-26-2014, 05:46 PM
a quick way to check this would be to get hold of a set of steel cranks, shorten them if needed, and then bend them to get the width you need. As this can be adjusted easily (you need a big vice and a thick pipe , or the "special" tool they may have at the LBS), it could save a lot of mistakes and some cash.
I used steel cranks at first to check if shorter was the way to go. Then I altered all my alloy cranks.
Steve G
.

darnthedog
02-26-2014, 05:50 PM
If your not moving your legs to where your legs are almost straight when extended might I suggest moving you BB forward a little. Extensions will not assist you if the pedals are too close. When the pedal is as far away as possible your knee should be nearly but not quite extended to it furthest reach. If it is still bent a lot then your cranks are too close.
Alternatively Bambuko suggestion may also be correct in that you are not in a low enough gear. Remember to build up slowly when first riding. Take short rides till your not feeling any pain. Don't want you crippled with blown out knees do we.