Doug's Warrior Plan Questions 1

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Hi,

I am starting a Warrior trike build. I have been reading and re-reading the instructions and I am developing a list of questions. I don't want to ask too many things at once so I will limit myself to one or two questions per thread.

Bottom Bracket:
Page 55 "If you cut the bottom bracket from an old bicycle frame, and leave a 12 inch or longer section of the seat tube connected...."
I understand the seat tube will be used to support the front derailleur. However... 12 inches? Scaling from Warrior photographs it looks like most builds only have about a 6" piece of the seat tube left. What is a realistic length of seat tube to leave behind.

Steering Booms:
Page 109 "One thing that is important is that the frame is propped up according to the 11 inch front boom ground clearance and that the rear wheel has an inflated tire and is standing perfectly vertical to the ground"
and
Page 110 "I placed the steering boom over the frame in order to use it as a guide, which works well, but remember that you will have to lower the front by 1.5 inches due to the height of the frame boom tubing."
The two bits of text are contradictory. Do you leave the frame at 11" height off the floor or do you lower the front frame section by 1.5" (to 9.5" above the floor)? Also, if the rear wheel is installed and you lower the frame... the frame is not going to be parallel to the floor anymore... so where would you measure the 9.5 or 11 inches?

I would appreciate any clarifying comments you can offer.

Thanks,
Doug L.
 
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With the Bottom Bracket you can better leave more on. You can shorten it, when you know what you need.

The second part.
Both. You need to lower the frame, so the arm will be ad the angle as it would be on the frame.
As it is to hight, the cut will not be good and it will have a gap, or as you weld it flat to the frame, the wheel will be under an angle.
 
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Cut somewhat above the derailleur mount allowing enough to mount a light unit, though most lights will require a horizontal bar to mount on, If you plan on using it after dark consider welding a bit of handlebar to it just above the derailleur. Work on the basis it's massively easier to shorten it later than add to it later.
 
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if you have the street fox plans he goes over cutting the derailleur tube. i noticed it to, its like he forgot to put that part in the plans, all of a sudden that tube is just a little longer than the crank is round.

You could also just raise the wheel by 1.5 inches. Then mark it like he shows, and it will fit. I also put a post in the other forum how i did this part that made it easier for me.
 
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Thank you all. I hope to be picking up my square tubing tomorrow.

Thom_G, thanks for your advice. I had been reading over your thread detailing your build. I am not done reading it all. I will be going back to read more and get a better understanding of how each of the wooden jigs work.

I am sure I will have more questions. For example...

On page 91 the plans include Diagram 5 which shows that the head tubes on the steering booms are angled "inward" to create negative camber. The figure also shows that the head tubes must lean toward the front of the trike to create an 80 degree caster angle. Since the head tubes are welded "square" to the outboard ends of the steering booms... what creates the 80 degree angle? Likewise, the plans show a track width of 30 inches between the head tubes. Since the head tubes are angled inward for negative camber, where is the 30 inch measurement taken from?
 
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Thanks for the suggestion but I don't have a 3D printer.

For years I used SolidWorks to model parts in 3D. Now that I am retired and have lost access to corporate CAD software I do my design work in Onshape (which is free with limitations).

If you have access to a 3D model of the Warrior Trike perhaps I could import it.
 
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Page 106, the diagram shows the 30" is from the center of the wheels.

The angle inward is created by how the fork stem is welded to the axle tab. The tab is bolted to the wheels axle, straight up and down, then the fork stem is tilted until you get the inward angle correct and then its welded into place.

The 80 degree angle, (where the top of the head tube is leaning toward the back of the trike), is set by where the steering boom is lined up to the frame.

I think you're over thinking it, if you start building you'll see how a lot of it solves itself as you go from one step to the next.
 
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Thanks for the suggestion but I don't have a 3D printer.

For years I used SolidWorks to model parts in 3D. Now that I am retired and have lost access to corporate CAD software I do my design work in Onshape (which is free with limitations).

If you have access to a 3D model of the Warrior Trike perhaps I could import it.
Fusion 360 is free and with your experience in sw, it will be no problem.
 
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Sorry... we're drifting off topic.
If I remember correctly, Fusion 360 is not free but "cheap" at about $350/year. Onshape in its basic form is available free while they also offer a higher functioning (Pro) version for an annual charge. Onshape was developed by former SolidWorks employees so it's look and feel is similar to what I was used to.

Regardless, at this time I would rather build the real Warrior than a CAD model.

I bought my square tubing this morning. Cutting and welding will start in a little while.
 
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Sorry... we're drifting off topic.
If I remember correctly, Fusion 360 is not free but "cheap" at about $350/year. Onshape in its basic form is available free while they also offer a higher functioning (Pro) version for an annual charge. Onshape was developed by former SolidWorks employees so it's look and feel is similar to what I was used to.

Regardless, at this time I would rather build the real Warrior than a CAD model.

I bought my square tubing this morning. Cutting and welding will start in a little while.
It is free but you only have a maximum of 10 projects active.
It is somewhere on their side free to download.

I used onshape but I switched to fusion 360.
It works a bit different, but with your sw experience, you will learn it fast.
I have sw somewhere but I need to look where I left it.
I worked with it and it us one of my favorite cad programs.
 
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I just joined. Bought 4 AZ bike plans. This is my first post to any sight, hope I'm doing it right. If you join the Experimental Aircraft Association for $40 yearly, (eaa.org) you get a free student license to SolidWorks, besides a GREAT monthly magazine on homebuilt aircraft, and free entrance to lots of museums all around the country. If married, go with the family membership for just $50 a year so you both get the museum freebies and 2 CAD licenses! I'm building the Viking (tandem tadpole). I need help resourcing the 14mm 20 inch rear wheel with 48 spokes. And the front two 20" wheels with 20mm cartridge bearings and 6 threaded holes for brake disc mounting. Help me please?????
 
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Hello from one new guy to another.

This was not intended to be a thread about SolidWorks but thank you for the information. Keep in mind that for regular SolidWorks they expect you to pay an annual maintenance fee to get software upgrades. If you don't upgrade each year you will find you cannot read files created by newer software versions. I do NOT know if SW handles the student version the same.

Back on topic....
Buying wheels has been my highest expenditure so far. I bought a pair of new-old-stock 20" Weinman wheels with 14mm axles and flip-flop hubs. I made a set of brake disc adapters for them rather than buy a pair. Then I modified the Weinman hubs so my adapters would bolt as well as thread on. This was an approach taken by Popshot in an older thread. The issue is that without the bolts the brake adapter on the left-hand front wheel can "unscrew" from the hub during braking. I am not planning on a 14mm axle for the rear wheel as it is not cantilevered like the front wheels and I am not planning on off-road riding. For the rear wheel I will be using one from a discarded mountain bike.
 
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I need help resourcing the 14mm 20 inch rear wheel with 48 spokes. And the front two 20" wheels with 20mm cartridge bearings and 6 threaded holes for brake disc mounting. Help me please?????
Ebay will have plenty of 14mm 20" rear wheels. There's plenty in the UK and I wouldn't expect that to be much different elsewhere. Make sure it has a std screw on thread for a normal freewheel rather than the 9 tooth arrangement some BMX use.
You won't find 20" wheels with 20mm axles. They don't exist. You have to make them. You need to buy the hubs and rims and then lace them. You are unlikely to find 48 hole 20mm hubs so try to find 36 hole ones with the disc mounts and matching rims. Use an online spoke calculator to work out the size of spokes needed and spend a couple of hours joining everything together.

 
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