Ed's 'StreetRunner' Quad Build

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Reposted this from Ed, what happens thread. I forgot what thread I was on.

I got the car out this morning before too much heat.
It was quite nice out this morning. Most of the smoke has left and there isn't any wind.
So had time to take these pics and make a solar pipe leak repair on the roof.






 
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Looks really snazzy! :D
Can you reach the steering wheel while sitting in the seat? It looks a long way in the pictyre,
 
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Looks really snazzy! :D
Can you reach the steering wheel while sitting in the seat? It looks a long way in the pictyre,
This should help. And I haven't completed the design on the seat bottom.
The car is built for my height, but if I make the seat bottom adjustable it will work with others as well.


 
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Looks great! I can't help feeling that the steering wheel is on the wrong side though.

Will you paint the top or cover in vinyl? Would look good in black.
Hi Kevin

The steering is set up for left-hand steering...meaning you sit in the right seat and steer with the left hand...Boom ! Boom !:D:D

I drove for 8 plus years on 'the wrong side of the road' in England. Even managed to crack up my brand new BSA.
Still have the scar to show for it.

My 'original' paint scheme was indeed to cover the top in a tan vinyl. I have it on hand, but am leaning toward all paint as of now.
My last thought, is the top will be painted the same as the rest of the body. Though I'd like to paint ghost flames' on the top.
Maybe Graucho will reconnect and paint a supper set of flames for me. I have his flames painting video, so I may have a go at it myself.
 
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Part of my nonproductivity has been lack of knowing which thing to tackle next.
Well, I finally made a decision and now it's 3/4 speed ahead. Can't go full steam. :)

I wasn't sure how I wanted to finish the rear brake issue. Since I only had one disc, it really didn't give me the braking action I wanted.
So I bought another brake kit, which is supposed to arrive between Sept 24-28. I bought this kit (same as the other one) from a seller closer to home, and $20 cheaper. MonsterScooterParts sent me incorrect hoses and never returned my emails or phone messages. So they have lost my business.

With the additional kit, I will have dual master cylinders, 4x4 braking, and two rear parking brake capability.
I will also have two leftover calipers and discs, for a future project.

Today I mounted the throttle and cut out access through the floorboard.






I am thinking of using two master cylinders. Side-by-side.
If that is the method I use, I will cut access holes in the floorboard for getting to the fluid reservoirs.
It will also require fabricating an actuating rod that will operate both cylinders at the same time.
I don't think it will be a huge challenge but won't know until the other kit arrives.



I'm still left with a brake hose issue. Whether I can use the ones from the kits (or want to).
I have in the back of my mind to make copper tubing for all lines except, from the frame to the calipers.
For those, I would like to use braided lines.

 
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Wow, coming right along! The only thing that caught my eye was the mention of copper hydraulic tubes. Shouldn't those be steel? Given how soft copper tubing is, I'd be leery of using it in a hydraulic application of any sort.
Copper-Nickel tubing is a common choice for brake lines as it is resistant to corrosion, the next one up from that is stainless-steel.
There is a table of BURST pressures HERE.
Copper-Nickel doesn't burst, nor corrode as easily as steel. It is perfectly safe for this application AFAIK.
 
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Wow, coming right along! The only thing that caught my eye was the mention of copper hydraulic tubes. Shouldn't those be steel? Given how soft copper tubing is, I'd be leery of using it in a hydraulic application of any sort.
Copper-Nickel tubing is a common choice for brake lines as it is resistant to corrosion, the next one up from that is stainless-steel.
There is a table of BURST pressures HERE.
Copper-Nickel doesn't burst, nor corrode as easily as steel. It is perfectly safe for this application AFAIK.
Interesting article. Thanks for the heads up.
I would not have thought that your run of the mill copper tubing from your local hardware store would be of concern.

My main reason for contemplating its use ...? Now that I'm writing this I can't think of any.
I planned on securing the tubing to the inner side of the frame rail. So for purely cosmetic reasons I suppose.
The copper (polished) would look nice up against the candy red paint. The black hoses that come with the kits will do to start.
We'll see what happens when I get all other parts fabricated and I'm ready for the hoses/tubing.

Just remembered. I might try to conceal the brake lines inside the frame rail. Especially at the front frame section where they may be more exposed.
That frame rail has an opening (presently covered) near the rear of its length where the line could reappear.
The concern with that is how to make the attaching point where the flex line meets the frame rail.

If I use the flex hose that comes with the kit, then I could run it all the way, through a grommet up the rail (inside) and out again just before attaching it to the master cylinder. However, that won't be so easy on the driver's side, with the steering box and frame rail in the way.
If I used copper tubing, it could be shaped to go around those obstacles.
Hmmmm ...decisions, decisions.:unsure::unsure:
 
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You can buy little tubing benders for brake lines, and they are very easy to use. It's even easy to put on your own ends if you have the flaring tool. A trip to a local junk yard might yield some ideas for attaching to the frame and also give ideas for mounting the hard line where it joins the flexible line at the wheels. I know on my Chevy truck, it's a bracket that has a locking tab mechanism to hold it in place. It's simple and works, and I think a lot of cars use something similar. You might even be able to take the brackets if they unbolt :)
 
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You can buy little tubing benders for brake lines, and they are very easy to use. It's even easy to put on your own ends if you have the flaring tool. A trip to a local junk yard might yield some ideas for attaching to the frame and also give ideas for mounting the hard line where it joins the flexible line at the wheels. I know on my Chevy truck, it's a bracket that has a locking tab mechanism to hold it in place. It's simple and works, and I think a lot of cars use something similar. You might even be able to take the brackets if they unbolt :)
Thanks Ryan

I have worked with copper tubing before and have the flaring tool. Just never had a need to secure the end, as would be needed in this instance.
I may get one of those tools, but up until now bending by hand has served me well enough.

Now that we're discussing the subject, I find that my main concern is the cosmetic appearance upfront.
The remaining lines will be up underneath in the rear.

My ideal thinking is the flex line from the front calipers would join at the side of the frame.
And then run inside the frame and out again where the master cylinder area is, which will be in the center of the car under the floorboards.
 
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Soft copper was used on cars for decades. Cunifer (copper and nickel alloy Cu + Ni) has superceeded it in most automotive applications and soft copper is somewhat harder to obtain, here at least, as a result. Unless you're using a servo I'd doubt you'd generate anywhere near enough pressure to worry copper but given the price you may as well use the tougher stuff to be safer. Copper is very easy to bend and can be done so easily by hand though results always look less than professional when doing that. Cunifer is much harder to bend and a proper bender will give much neater results.
 
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Interesting article. Thanks for the heads up.
I would not have thought that your run of the mill copper tubing from your local hardware store would be of concern.

My main reason for contemplating its use ...? Now that I'm writing this I can't think of any.
I planned on securing the tubing to the inner side of the frame rail. So for purely cosmetic reasons I suppose.
The copper (polished) would look nice up against the candy red paint. The black hoses that come with the kits will do to start.
We'll see what happens when I get all other parts fabricated and I'm ready for the hoses/tubing.

Just remembered. I might try to conceal the brake lines inside the frame rail. Especially at the front frame section where they may be more exposed.
That frame rail has an opening (presently covered) near the rear of its length where the line could reappear.
The concern with that is how to make the attaching point where the flex line meets the frame rail.

If I use the flex hose that comes with the kit, then I could run it all the way, through a grommet up the rail (inside) and out again just before attaching it to the master cylinder. However, that won't be so easy on the driver's side, with the steering box and frame rail in the way.
If I used copper tubing, it could be shaped to go around those obstacles.
Hmmmm ...decisions, decisions.:unsure::unsure:
Could part of the brake-lines divert into a moonshine still condenser-tube? :unsure:
 
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Got my second brake kit. It isn't 'exactly' like the other one. A bit of style change, even though both sellers used the same picture.

It's not going to be a problem. The only big difference is the fluid cup is larger,
and the brake switch connections are different.
But neither one is a problem.

I've spent a large amount of time, trying to design the mounting for the two cylinders and the actuating arm.
The first pic shows what will become the mounting bracket for the cylinders.
It comes from an old tread mill frame.


The cylinders will be mounted to what used to hold the treadmill footplate.





Here you can see where the cylinders will be mounted.



The black metal piece is from my old garden tractor. It was used as part of the mower blade mechanism.
Now I will cut it down to fit this application. The 'arms' are just right, width-wise but will need shortening.
The shaft will be housed inside the frame rails, except for the arm that will attach to the brake pedal.



An overview of how it all ties together.



And here we have the two (same size different parents) discs for the rear brakes.

 
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Seeing you mount those cylinders brings back memories of building a race car and finding a perfect ready made racing pedal box assembly in a Reliant Robin of all cars
 
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The master cylinders have two pistons so it should have two ports to connect hoses to.
On the brake lines, JEGS sells plastic tubing designed for brake lines. Defiantly lighter and easier to use.
I have a similar master cylinder that I could never get to work but it has three ports to connect to plus the brake light switch.
 
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