Jon's Warrior Build

Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
107
Location
Ontario, Canada
I can print with carbon using my printer, but I have to replace the nozzle with a special hardened steel nozzle (otherwise the carbon fibers will wear down the normal nozzle very quickly). I have the hardened steel nozzle, just haven't gotten around to taking apart the print head to replace it.
 
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
868
Location
Axedale, Victoria, Australia
Website
axerail.coffeecup.com
A friend of mine said recently, "We spend money purchasing time and labour saving devices and then use that saved time and labour in keeping those devices working."

There is always something new to buy or something new to make.
 
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
107
Location
Ontario, Canada
So after a couple full 8-10 hour days working on the software, its working now - I'm pretty happy about that.

Here's what the UI looks like:



The two blue circles indicate the headlights, and the two red squares indicate the taillights. They are all off at this point. The battery indicator on the right is working - it current runs of the battery voltage, and scales its output (ten segments) over the batteries reasonable voltage range, which is 9.6 - 12.6 volts.

The two buttons on the right currently just cycle the headlights between their modes, which in this case cycles from off to high beam to low beam to flashing and then back to off. I use the joystick left and right to cycle each tail light between on and off. One of the interesting things to code is I want the headlights to always come up in the same mode (off, with the next click going to high beams). I use the current detection board (at the bottom of the stack) to measure the current while I turn on each head light in sequence, to figure out which mode it is in, and then power cycle each one enough times so that the next time they turn on they are in high beam mode.

Here's what it looks like with the left headlight on low beam, and the right on flash, with the tail lights on.



I'm planning on having lighting modes that I can pick, that combine light patterns for each light, but that will come later.
 
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
868
Location
Axedale, Victoria, Australia
Website
axerail.coffeecup.com
A good example of doing what YOU want and not sticking to mainstream. Good on you.

There are probably only 2 ways that the low, high and flash modes are controlled from their microprocessor: PWM or limiting supplied power.

Once you have found out, you could ditch their installed micro and drive it from an Arduino, or similar, in a way that suits yourself. I think I would have the headlight power up on low beam as you would probably want to be seen before you would have to use it to see. Once on, toggle between low and high beam. Many options available.
 
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Joined
Feb 7, 2008
Messages
3,239
Location
Nottinghamshire England
A friend of mine said recently, "We spend money purchasing time and labour saving devices and then use that saved time and labour in keeping those devices working."

There is always something new to buy or something new to make.
Terry Wogan once said:-

all these people out jogging and running want to live longer.

They spend the time they gain ?

jogging and running !
 
Joined
May 28, 2013
Messages
120
Location
Ottawa
Nice build. curious how you plan to weather proof the display and still have use of the joystick and buttons. I see two screw holes which I presume are for a clear cover of some sort?
 
Joined
May 28, 2013
Messages
120
Location
Ottawa
Yeah, I've got a small "hood" for the display that I haven't printed yet, and as you surmised, it will mount on those two holes.
Cool. I tend to over engineer my solutions to problems😁. I would still put some sort of clear plate there, then the hood so I could read it in daylight - I have been caught out in some weird windy storms over the years, and a hood wouldn't be enough to keep rain from 'spinning' into the display around here. But that is me. You do you! ;-)
 
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
107
Location
Ontario, Canada
Cool. I tend to over engineer my solutions to problems😁. I would still put some sort of clear plate there, then the hood so I could read it in daylight - I have been caught out in some weird windy storms over the years, and a hood wouldn't be enough to keep rain from 'spinning' into the display around here. But that is me. You do you! ;-)
Yeah, the issue with the clear plate, unless it is easy to remove, is there are buttons and a joystick that need to be manipulated. I guess I should look at having a sliding window on the hood - maybe a piece of acrylic, ~1mm thick, that can slide sideways in a slot to allow access to the controls. I'm not going to be commuting with this trike - its strictly for exercise and enjoyment, so I won't plan to be out in the rain, but of course there are no guarantees with the weather, so I'd rather be safe than sorry.
 
Joined
May 28, 2013
Messages
120
Location
Ottawa
Agreed the buttons and joystick are a challenge. A light touch of silicone to hold an o-ring that just stays inside the perimiter of the rubber pad for the joystick comes to mind. Thin silicon rubber sheet or button covers that are sealed to the acrylic so you can click the buttons might work. Or a clear flexible silicone cover over the slightly exposed electronics might work (seal at edges). Not entirely sure that falls into the sort of thing home makers can get their hands on. The mind wonders, and wanders.
 
Joined
Jul 7, 2020
Messages
107
Location
Ontario, Canada
Sure. Here's an overview:



This is the back mounting bracket:



The back is designed to be mounted to two places, but I ignored that and used a couple longer 3D printed spacers to center-mount it. I also used 8mm threaded stainless steel stock for the "bolt", and stainless nylock nuts on each side to hold it all together. I had to drill out the holes in the seat mount to 8mm though - they were originally more like 5 or 6mm.

And here's the front:



The front fit nicely over the square tube, with just some small spacers that I 3D printed - could have just as easily used washers or machined spacers or whatever.

My butt hits the center bar (through the seat) if I sit up, but sitting back in riding position there are no issues. If it ends up really bothering me, I will weld a flat plate to each side of the square tube that sticks up a bit, and mount the seat to that, an inch above the tube.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
84
Location
Ohio
so WAAAAAAY back a while, you were building this and there was an issue with the steering bar that connects the tabs on the wheels hitting the frame. Well I'm building a warrior and totally jacked your idea for the wood frame to support everything and i had the same issue the axle (okay emt conduit) was hitting the frame. I ended up digging in the old forum posts and found some by "spinner" and he did the axle idea also and his clearly went under the frame and he clamped the axle to the frame to keep it all square. So I looked over the plans and if the center of the hub isn't at least 12 inches off the ground, the the steering will hit the frame because it's a right angle straight back from the top of the axle and the support is a 3/4 in piece of tube. I still don't know how Brad's worked and how "spinners" worked, unless 11" on page 32 is a typo or the size of tires has changed since the plans were made, it does mention spacers, but no picture show a 1.5" spacer on the bearing rod. I had to raise up the front of the tube/frame it hits to 12.5 in" to get the axle to slide under it but i'm going to fit test more to see if even that will help, I'm kind of wondering if this will help resolve the issue I had with the back wheel and support not lining up, I cut a 45 in the tube but the angle doesn't match up with the back wheel support when the back brace is at a 45....long story all to say, it's not just your build, something isn't matching up somewhere....
 
Joined
Oct 14, 2020
Messages
78
Location
Broken Arrow, Oklahoma
Sure. Here's an overview:



This is the back mounting bracket:



The back is designed to be mounted to two places, but I ignored that and used a couple longer 3D printed spacers to center-mount it. I also used 8mm threaded stainless steel stock for the "bolt", and stainless nylock nuts on each side to hold it all together. I had to drill out the holes in the seat mount to 8mm though - they were originally more like 5 or 6mm.

And here's the front:



The front fit nicely over the square tube, with just some small spacers that I 3D printed - could have just as easily used washers or machined spacers or whatever.

My butt hits the center bar (through the seat) if I sit up, but sitting back in riding position there are no issues. If it ends up really bothering me, I will weld a flat plate to each side of the square tube that sticks up a bit, and mount the seat to that, an inch above the tube.
Just ordered seat and cover, ready for it and thank You for the pictures, helps me a lot.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2020
Messages
84
Location
Ohio
I figured out spinners fix, he posted a pic of his brakes and you can see the support tubes were welded to the axle tabs right against the bolts, not on the crown head like in the pdf.
 
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