Photo posting ImgBB vs Postimg.cc

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My opinion of the difference between the two photo sharing services.

It has been a very long time since I used PostImage.org/Postimg.cc for uploading my photos.
I have noticed recently that the new Postimg.cc is very different than when I used it.

The ad space takes up I would estimate to be at least 40-50% of the page size.
And, the ads are constantly changing (moving). Today I even detected a video.

For me people that, is a real turn-off and nowhere near fun.

In stark contrast there is ImgBB.

I have been using ImgBB ever since postimage took and dumped their old version, and millions lost their photos.

The great advantage of ImgBB (at least for now) is that when you load your photos to ImgBB, that's all you get back.
The viewer only sees your photo, not any advertising.

For anyone that would like to investigate further, I posted how to use ImgBB here;
https://atomiczombie.com/forum/threads/posting-photos.20/page-2 (scroll down to #32)

If you take the time to take and post photos of your work, then it would be nice if your viewers could view without distracting advertising.
No links, your photos are embedded right into your post. East, Peasy.

Here's a ImgBB example

Just your hard clever work. No annoying advertising
Just a thought towards my viewers enjoying the photo's better.
Go ahead and click on the photo, to see how it enlarges.

 
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I'm clearly missing something.
All my posted pictures are hosted on Postimg.cc.
I see no ads there or on my AZ picture postings using postimg as the direct-link source, do you?
Maybe I have an ad-blocker running that filters it out.
 
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I'm clearly missing something.
All my posted pictures are hosted on Postimg.cc.
I see no ads there or on my AZ picture postings using postimg as the direct-link source, do you?
Maybe I have an ad-blocker running that filters it out.
Sorry Idaho, not picking on you.

Maybe it's in the method of posting them to the thread???

This is what I'm talking about.


 
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OK ED, I can see ads on your links; IF I turn off my Ad-Blocker.
With ads so pervasive everywhere my default (except for sites where I want to see their ads) is OFF.
I will go look at my own posts with adblocker turned off now. :)
 
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I see no ads there or on my AZ picture postings using postimg as the direct-link source, do you?
I'm using (BBCode full linked)
Using the BBCode, you have a choice of thumbnail, or full size, and is viewed directly in the post.
Both of these choices, allow the viewer, to click on the photo, to view a larger size.
 
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I see no ads either in those images, nor in any images posted by anybody on here using any service. I run a lot of privacy/security options such as ublock origin, privacy badger, https everywhere, cookie auto delete, trocker, canvas blocker, facebook container etc. I also use firefox as it's not the information hoover that is Chrome or Edge.

Ublock origin - blocks ads. A small handful of sites detect it and beg you to disable it. A smaller handful won't show the site unless you disable it. Your choice. Two clicks to disable/enable.
Privacy badger - Blocks advertising and tracking. Can break some sites. Occasionally needs some tweeking as you visit sites for the first time after install.
https everywhere - redirects you to a https version of a http site if it exists. https is more secure than http. No downside to it.
Cookie auto delete - automatically deletes all cookies from a site when you close the tab. Has the effect of logging you out so there is a whitelist feature to put sites in as you visit for the first time so it doesn't delete that sites cookies. It means that if you are visiting a site and not likely ever to be back or only back occasionally then you can simply accept the cookies knowing they'll be gone imminently. Saves a lot of multiple clicking to deny them cookie access.
Trocker - removes tracking features. Many mails contain tracking systems that know when you opened the email, what you used to open the email and where you were. Trocker removes those. No downside.
Canvas blocker - stops fingerprinting. Your browser talks to a website to confirm what it is so it can get information in a way it can display it. This can be unique like a fingerprint and thus identify you. Canvas blocker feeds some fake info into this to stop it. Can break some sites.
Facebook container - keeps facebook in it's own world where it can't track you outside of it's own domain. I don't use facebook but you don't need to to find them tracking you. Can cause issues.
 
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Some things are learned out of nesessity, such as how to do a screen save.
So I guess it's not all bad.

Anyway, here is what I get

 
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I see no ads either in those images, nor in any images posted by anybody on here using any service. I run a lot of privacy/security options such as ublock origin, privacy badger, https everywhere, cookie auto delete, trocker, canvas blocker, facebook container etc. I also use firefox as it's not the information hoover that is Chrome or Edge.

Ublock origin - blocks ads. A small handful of sites detect it and beg you to disable it. A smaller handful won't show the site unless you disable it. Your choice. Two clicks to disable/enable.
Privacy badger - Blocks advertising and tracking. Can break some sites. Occasionally needs some tweeking as you visit sites for the first time after install.
https everywhere - redirects you to a https version of a http site if it exists. https is more secure than http. No downside to it.
Cookie auto delete - automatically deletes all cookies from a site when you close the tab. Has the effect of logging you out so there is a whitelist feature to put sites in as you visit for the first time so it doesn't delete that sites cookies. It means that if you are visiting a site and not likely ever to be back or only back occasionally then you can simply accept the cookies knowing they'll be gone imminently. Saves a lot of multiple clicking to deny them cookie access.
Trocker - removes tracking features. Many mails contain tracking systems that know when you opened the email, what you used to open the email and where you were. Trocker removes those. No downside.
Canvas blocker - stops fingerprinting. Your browser talks to a website to confirm what it is so it can get information in a way it can display it. This can be unique like a fingerprint and thus identify you. Canvas blocker feeds some fake info into this to stop it. Can break some sites.
Facebook container - keeps facebook in it's own world where it can't track you outside of it's own domain. I don't use facebook but you don't need to to find them tracking you. Can cause issues.
That's a bunch of info Popshot. Thank you.

Do I understand that you are using all of them at once?
 
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Yes. All except the facebook container. I've currently disabled it due to a few too many issues. I'll try it again in a few weeks. Each person will strike their own balance on privacy vs convenience. I also run a vpn almost permanently and it's also a good idea to not use the free router from your isp. They have backdoors for management and often tie you to a set dns rather than allowing you to set your own choice.
 
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Yes. All except the facebook container. I've currently disabled it due to a few too many issues. I'll try it again in a few weeks. Each person will strike their own balance on privacy vs convenience. I also run a vpn almost permanently and it's also a good idea to not use the free router from your isp. They have backdoors for management and often tie you to a set dns rather than allowing you to set your own choice.
Understood, but what is 'dns'?
I should look into VPN a bit more.
 
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I use Private Internet Access for a VPN. Not the very cheapest and a long way short of the most expensive. They work very reliably and have the speed to barely slow matters down. I've used them for 5 years or so now and have no complaints. I can appear to be in any number of countries to get around geoblocking and my ISP can only see me talking to PIA. They see nothing after that. I have no delusions that the NSA or GCHQ could easily monitor me should they choose to do so but they'd need a good reason to make that effort and I doubt I qualify there.

A DNS or Domain Name System is like a phonebook for the net. It converts you typing in giganticjugs.com into a number or alphanumeric system that points to the right site. A DNS can point you to the right site, the wrong site or can be ordered by governments to block that site. There are a number of DNS systems that you can use such as googles own or Cloudfare, Open, Quad9 etc. Changing what DNS you use is as simple as finding the DNS settings in the router and swapping them for the new ones and is one of the ways to get around government mandated site blocks. Many ISP supplied routers will not allow the DNS to be changed from their own. If you've never come to a site with a "blocked" signage or a site that simply won't ever load despite downforeveryoneorjustme.com telling you it's up then you probably don't need to change your DNS.
 
Joined
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I use Private Internet Access for a VPN. Not the very cheapest and a long way short of the most expensive. They work very reliably and have the speed to barely slow matters down. I've used them for 5 years or so now and have no complaints. I can appear to be in any number of countries to get around geoblocking and my ISP can only see me talking to PIA. They see nothing after that. I have no delusions that the NSA or GCHQ could easily monitor me should they choose to do so but they'd need a good reason to make that effort and I doubt I qualify there.

A DNS or Domain Name System is like a phonebook for the net. It converts you typing in giganticjugs.com into a number or alphanumeric system that points to the right site. A DNS can point you to the right site, the wrong site or can be ordered by governments to block that site. There are a number of DNS systems that you can use such as googles own or Cloudfare, Open, Quad9 etc. Changing what DNS you use is as simple as finding the DNS settings in the router and swapping them for the new ones and is one of the ways to get around government mandated site blocks. Many ISP supplied routers will not allow the DNS to be changed from their own. If you've never come to a site with a "blocked" signage or a site that simply won't ever load despite downforeveryoneorjustme.com telling you it's up then you probably don't need to change your DNS.
Thanks for taking the time to explain.
 
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